dock definition

  • noun:
    • The area of water between two piers or alongside a pier that obtains a ship for running, unloading, or repairs.
    • A pier; a wharf.
    • several piers on a commercial waterfront that act as a general landing location for boats or boats. Frequently found in the plural.
    • A platform where trucks or trains load or unload cargo.
    • The solid or fleshy section of an animal's tail.
    • The end of an animal after it is often bobbed or clipped.
    • the location of water between two piers or alongside a pier that obtains a ship for running, unloading, or fixes.
    • A pier; a wharf.
    • a team of piers on a commercial waterfront that serve as a broad landing location for ships or boats. Usually found in the plural.
    • A platform from which trucks or trains load or unload cargo.
    • An enclosed place in which the defendant stands or sits in a court of law.
    • See sorrel1.
    • the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with little green flowers regarding buckwheat, especially the typical dock, and used as potherbs as well as in folk medication, especially in treating nettle rash.
    • A burdock plant, or even the leaves of this plant.
    • The fleshy reason behind an animal's tail.
    • The area of the end which remains following the tail happens to be docked.
    • The solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail.
    • The end of an animal after it was bobbed or clipped.
    • An enclosed location where defendant stands or sits in a court of law.
    • See sorrel1.
    • The bottom or anal area.
    • a set construction mounted on shore that a vessel is guaranteed whenever in port.
    • The body of water between two piers.
    • A structure mounted on shore for running and unloading vessels.
    • A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    • A device designed as a base for keeping a connected portable appliance like a laptop computer system (in this case, referred to as a docking section), or a mobile telephone, for providing the necessary electric cost for the autonomy, or as a hardware expansion for additional abilities.
    • some of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy flowers with tiny green flowers pertaining to buckwheat, especially the typical dock, and utilized as potherbs and in folk medicine, especially in curing nettle rash.
    • A burdock plant, and/or leaves of this plant.
    • The fleshy reason behind an animal's tail.
    • The an element of the end which stays after the end has-been docked.
    • The buttocks or rectum.
    • A fixed structure attached to shore to which a vessel is guaranteed whenever in port.
    • The body of water between two piers.
    • A toolbar that delivers the user with a way of releasing programs, and changing between flowing programs.
    • An act of docking; joining two things together.
    • element of a courtroom where accused rests.
    • A genus of flowers (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which may have a long taproot consequently they are hard of extermination.
    • The solid section of an animal's tail, as distinguished from tresses; the stump of a tail; the element of a tail left after clipping or cutting.
    • A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.
    • A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    • A device created as a base for keeping a connected lightweight device including a laptop computer (in cases like this, named a docking section), or a mobile phone, for providing the essential electrical cost because of its autonomy, or as a hardware extension for additional abilities.
    • A toolbar that provides an individual with a way of introducing programs, and switching between running applications.
    • An act of docking; joining a couple of things collectively.
    • Part of a courtroom in which the accused sits.
    • an incident of fabric to pay for the clipped or reduce tail of a horse.
    • An artificial basin or an inclosure regarding the a harbor or lake, -- used for the reception of vessels, and given gates for maintaining in or closing out the wave.
    • The slide or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, the reception of vessels; -- occasionally like the piers by themselves.
    • A genus of flowers (Rumex), some species of that are well-known weeds which may have an extended taproot and they are tough of extermination.
    • The solid element of an animal's tail, as distinguished from hair; the stump of a tail; the section of a tail remaining after clipping or cutting.
    • A case of leather-based to cover the cut or slashed end of a horse.
    • An artificial basin or an inclosure associated with a harbor or lake, -- employed for the reception of vessels, and supplied with gates for keeping in or shutting out of the wave.
    • The slide or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, the reception of ships; -- occasionally including the piers themselves.
    • The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.
    • the area in court where a criminal or accused individual appears.
    • The common name of those species of Rumex which are characterized by minimum acidity and also the leaves that are not hastate. They're coarse herbs, mostly perennials, with thickened rootstocks.
    • A name of varied other types of flowers, mainly coarse weeds with broad leaves, as dovedock, the coltsfoot, Tussilago Farfara; elf-dock, the elecampane, Inula Helenium; prairie-dock, Silphium terebinthinum; circular dock, the most popular mallow, Malva sylvestris; spatter-dock, the yellow pond-lily, Nuphar advena; sweet dock, Polygonum Bistorta; velvet dock, the mullen, Verbascum Thapsus. See burdock, candock, and hardock.
    • The tail of a beast cut quick or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of a tail.
    • The common name of the types of Rumex that are characterized by little if any acidity together with leaves of which aren't hastate. They've been coarse natural herbs, mostly perennials, with thickened rootstocks.
    • The buttocks; the rump.
    • A name of numerous other species of plants, mostly coarse weeds with broad leaves, as dovedock, the coltsfoot, Tussilago Farfara; elf-dock, the elecampane, Inula Helenium; prairie-dock, Silphium terebinthinum; circular dock, the common mallow, Malva sylvestris; spatter-dock, the yellow pond-lily, Nuphar advena; sweet dock, Polygonum Bistorta; velvet dock, the mullen, Verbascum Thapsus. See burdock, candock, and hardock.
    • The fleshy element of a boar's chine, between your middle and rump.
    • The end of a beast slashed brief or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of a tail.
    • The buttocks; the rump.
    • The fleshy section of a boar's chine, between the center in addition to rump.
    • an incident of leather to cover the cut or slashed end of a horse.
    • a bit of leather creating element of a crupper.
    • The crupper of a saddle.
    • The stern of a ship.
    • The area of liquid between two piers or alongside a pier that obtains a ship for loading, unloading, or repairs.
    • A pier; a wharf.
    • several piers on a commercial waterfront that act as an over-all landing location for boats or ships. Frequently used in the plural.
    • an instance of leather-based to cover the clipped or slashed end of a horse.
    • an item of leather creating element of a crupper.
    • The crupper of a saddle.
    • The stern of a ship.
    • In hydraulic engin., strictly, an inclosed water-space which a ship floats while being loaded or unloaded, because the room between two wharves or piers; by extension, any area or construction in or where a ship could be berthed or held for running, unloading, fixing, or safe-keeping.
    • The place where a criminal stands in courtroom.
    • Rumex persicarioides, an American species very long confounded with all the golden dock for the Old World, available on sandy shores from New Brunswick to Virginia and westward to Kansas and New Mexico, and on Pacific coastline.
    • Docks are distinguished generally as damp docks, or those composed of an inclosed water-space or basin which ships lie to take in or discharge cargo, and which can't be moved dried out; and dry-docks, by which vessels is taken totally free from liquid. The second are split into excavated or graving-docks, slip-docks, lifting-docks, and drifting docks. A basin dock is a wet dock whoever entry is constantly open to the tide; a closed dock, one whose entry is closed by a lock, caisson, or gate to be able to take care of the interior water-level roughly constant. A slip-dock is one where a vessel is partly hauled out on a marine railroad in a slip provided with gates that are shut at low wave, excluding water from vessel. A lifting-dock is certainly one for which a submerged system where the ship is landed on obstructs and is after that raised vertically clear of the water with the ship by hydraulic power. An off-shore dock is a floating dock with a bottom aud one side-wall, maintained in an upright place in the shape of top and reduced synchronous booms attached to the side-wall and also to strong vertical articles built on the foreshore. A box-dock is a floating dock whose stops can be closed by caissons or gates following the entrance regarding the vessel, the interior room becoming after that moved out as in a graving-dock. A balance-dock could be the ordinary variety of floating dock with available ends, in which the side wall space arc used as ballast compartments to keep the dock in standard stability. A self-docking floating dock is the one therefore organized in detachable areas that its underwater parts is successively docked by the remaining parts for evaluation and fixes.
    • the region of liquid between two piers or alongside a pier that receives a ship for running, unloading, or repairs.
    • A pier; a wharf.
    • several piers on a commercial waterfront that act as an over-all landing area for ships or ships. Frequently found in the plural.
    • A platform where vehicles or trains load or unload cargo.
    • A platform at which vehicles or trains load or unload cargo.
    • The solid or fleshy part of an animal's end.
    • In hydraulic engin., strictly, an inclosed water-space which a ship floats while becoming filled or unloaded, due to the fact area between two wharves or piers; by extension, any space or construction in or where a ship can be berthed or held for running, unloading, restoring, or safe-keeping.
    • In railroading, a track at a siding or in a freight garden, having an increasing platform on each side for convenience in loading in the amount of the car home.
    • where a criminal stands in judge.
    • a platform in which vehicles or trains can be filled or unloaded
    • The solid or fleshy element of an animal's end.
    • The tail of an animal after it was bobbed or clipped.
    • The end of an animal after it's been bobbed or cut.
    • the solid bony an element of the end of an animal as distinguished through the locks
    • landing in a harbor alongside a pier in which boats are filled and unloaded or repaired; could have gates to let water in or out
    • Rumex persicarioides, an American species long confounded because of the fantastic dock of the old-world, found on sandy shores from New Brunswick to Virginia and westward to Kansas and New Mexico, as well as regarding Pacific coast.
    • a brief or shortened end of specific creatures
    • a specific spot where in fact the defendant appears or sits in a court of law.
    • Docks tend to be distinguished broadly as wet docks, or those composed of an inclosed water-space or basin which ships lie experience or discharge cargo, and which can't be moved dried out; and dry-docks, in which vessels are taken totally free from liquid. The latter tend to be divided into excavated or graving-docks, slip-docks, lifting-docks, and floating docks. A basin dock is a wet dock whose entry is continually available to the wave; a closed dock, one whose entry is shut by a lock, caisson, or gate so as to maintain the interior water-level approximately continual. A slip-dock is certainly one for which a vessel is partially hauled out on a marine railroad in a slip supplied with gates that are closed at low wave, excluding water from vessel. A lifting-dock is certainly one by which a submerged platform which the ship is landed on obstructs and is after that raised vertically clear of the water aided by the ship by hydraulic energy. An off-shore dock is a floating dock with a bottom aud one side-wall, maintained in an upright place in the shape of upper and reduced parallel booms connected to the side wall and strong vertical articles constructed on the foreshore. A box-dock is a floating dock whose finishes may be closed by caissons or gates following the entrance of this vessel, the inner space becoming then pumped down such as a graving-dock. A balance-dock is the ordinary type of floating dock with available finishes, where part wall space arc used as ballast compartments to steadfastly keep up the dock in standard stability. A self-docking floating dock is just one so organized in detachable sections that its underwater components may be successively docked because of the remaining parts for assessment and fixes.
    • a platform built out from the shore into the liquid and sustained by heaps; provides use of ships and ships
    • an enclosure in a court of legislation in which the defendant sits during the trial
    • In railroading, a track at a siding or in a freight yard, having an elevated platform for each part for convenience in running during the level of the car home.
    • a specific destination where in actuality the defendant appears or sits in a court of legislation.
    • a platform in which vehicles or trains may be loaded or unloaded
    • See sorrel1.
    • See sorrel1.
    • the solid bony area of the end of an animal as distinguished from hair
    • Any of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with little green flowers linked to buckwheat, especially the typical dock, and used as potherbs plus people medication, particularly in healing nettle rash.
    • some of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with tiny green blossoms regarding buckwheat, especially the common dock, and utilized as potherbs and in people medication, particularly in treating nettle rash.
    • A burdock plant, or the leaves of the plant.
    • A burdock plant, or the leaves of that plant.
    • landing in a harbor next to a pier in which vessels are packed and unloaded or repaired; could have gates to let liquid in or out
    • any one of particular coarse weedy flowers with lengthy taproots, sometimes used as table vegetables or in folk medicine
    • The fleshy cause of an animal's end.
    • a quick or shortened end of specific animals
    • The fleshy root of an animal's end.
    • a platform built right out of the shore in to the water and sustained by piles; provides usage of boats and ships
    • The an element of the tail which continues to be following the end has-been docked.
    • The an element of the tail which stays after the tail was docked.
    • The bottom or anus.
    • an enclosure in a court of legislation where in fact the defendant sits during test
    • The buttocks or rectum.
    • a set construction attached with shore that a vessel is guaranteed whenever in interface.
    • a set framework attached to shore that a vessel is guaranteed when in slot.
    • some of specific coarse weedy plants with lengthy taproots, often utilized as dining table vegetables or in folk medicine
    • your body of liquid between two piers.
    • your body of liquid between two piers.
    • A structure mounted on shore for loading and unloading vessels.
    • A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.
    • A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    • A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    • a computer device designed as a base for holding a connected transportable appliance such as a laptop computer system (in this instance, named a docking station), or a mobile phone, for supplying the essential electrical cost for its autonomy, or as a hardware expansion for extra capabilities.
    • a tool created as a base for keeping a connected portable appliance such as for instance a laptop computer (in cases like this, known as a docking section), or a mobile telephone, for providing the essential electric fee because of its autonomy, or as a hardware expansion for extra abilities.
    • A toolbar that provides an individual with an easy method of launching programs, and switching between running applications.
    • A toolbar providing you with an individual with a way of starting programs, and changing between flowing programs.
    • An act of docking; joining two things collectively.
    • An act of docking; joining two things collectively.
    • section of a courtroom in which the accused rests.
    • A genus of plants (Rumex), some types of which are well-known weeds that have a long taproot consequently they are difficult of extermination.
    • The solid element of an animal's end, as distinguished through the tresses; the stump of a tail; the element of a tail remaining after cutting or cutting.
    • A case of leather-based to cover the clipped or cut end of a horse.
    • An artificial basin or an inclosure relating to a harbor or lake, -- utilized for the reception of vessels, and supplied with gates for keeping in or shutting from tide.
    • The slide or water-way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for reception of boats; -- occasionally like the piers themselves.
    • The place in judge where a criminal or accused person stands.
    • the typical title of the species of Rumex that are characterized by minimal acidity in addition to leaves which aren't hastate. They're coarse herbs, mainly perennials, with thickened rootstocks.
    • A name of various various other species of plants, mainly coarse weeds with wide leaves, as dovedock, the coltsfoot, Tussilago Farfara; elf-dock, the elecampane, Inula Helenium; prairie-dock, Silphium terebinthinum; round dock, the typical mallow, Malva sylvestris; spatter-dock, the yellow pond-lily, Nuphar advena; nice dock, Polygonum Bistorta; velvet dock, the mullen, Verbascum Thapsus. See burdock, candock, and hardock.
    • The end of a beast cut brief or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid element of a tail.
    • The bottom; the rump.
    • The fleshy section of a boar's chine, amongst the middle plus the rump.
    • an incident of leather-based to pay for the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
    • section of a courtroom where in fact the accused sits.
    • A genus of flowers (Rumex), some species of that are popular weeds which may have a long taproot and are also difficult of extermination.
    • The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished through the locks; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail remaining after clipping or cutting.
    • an incident of leather to pay for the cut or cut tail of a horse.
    • An artificial basin or an inclosure relating to a harbor or river, -- useful for the reception of vessels, and supplied with gates for keeping in or shutting out the wave.
    • The slide or water-way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of boats; -- often including the piers by themselves.
    • the spot in judge in which a criminal or accused individual appears.
    • the normal name of those types of Rumex which are described as minimum acidity additionally the leaves of which aren't hastate. These are typically coarse herbs, mostly perennials, with thickened rootstocks.
    • A name of varied various other species of flowers, mainly coarse weeds with broad leaves, as dovedock, the coltsfoot, Tussilago Farfara; elf-dock, the elecampane, Inula Helenium; prairie-dock, Silphium terebinthinum; circular dock, the most popular mallow, Malva sylvestris; spatter-dock, the yellowish pond-lily, Nuphar advena; nice dock, Polygonum Bistorta; velvet dock, the mullen, Verbascum Thapsus. See burdock, candock, and hardock.
    • The end of a beast slashed short or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid section of a tail.
    • The bottom; the rump.
    • The fleshy section of a boar's chine, amongst the middle together with rump.
    • an incident of leather-based to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
    • some leather developing section of a crupper.
    • The crupper of a saddle.
    • The stern of a ship.
    • A piece of leather-based creating part of a crupper.
    • The crupper of a saddle.
    • The stern of a ship.
    • In hydraulic engin., strictly, an inclosed water-space for which a ship floats while becoming loaded or unloaded, while the area between two wharves or piers; by expansion, any area or structure in or upon which a ship can be berthed or held for running, unloading, restoring, or safe-keeping.
    • The place where a criminal appears in court.
    • Rumex persicarioides, an American species very long confounded with the golden dock for the old-world, entirely on sandy shores from brand new Brunswick to Virginia and westward to Kansas and brand new Mexico, and in addition from the Pacific shore.
    • In hydraulic engin., strictly, an inclosed water-space by which a ship floats while becoming packed or unloaded, as room between two wharves or piers; by extension, any room or structure in or where a ship could be berthed or held for loading, unloading, fixing, or safe-keeping.
    • Docks tend to be distinguished broadly as damp docks, or those consisting of an inclosed water-space or basin by which ships lie to take or discharge cargo, and which cannot be pumped dried out; and dry-docks, where vessels is taken totally free from water. The latter are divided in to excavated or graving-docks, slip-docks, lifting-docks, and drifting docks. A basin dock is a wet dock whose entry is constantly available to the wave; a closed dock, one whoever entry is shut by a lock, caisson, or gate so as to take care of the interior water-level roughly continual. A slip-dock is just one which a vessel is partly hauled out on a marine railroad in a slip supplied with gates which are closed at reasonable tide, excluding water from the vessel. A lifting-dock is certainly one which a submerged system by which the ship is landed on obstructs and is after that raised vertically clear of the water because of the ship by hydraulic power. An off-shore dock is a floating dock with a bottom aud one side wall, maintained in an upright place in the shape of top and reduced parallel booms connected to the side wall and to strong straight columns constructed on the foreshore. A box-dock is a floating dock whoever stops may be shut by caissons or gates following the entrance for the vessel, the inside room being then moved on like in a graving-dock. A balance-dock may be the ordinary sort of floating dock with open ends, in which the side wall space arc utilized as ballast compartments to maintain the dock in level balance. A self-docking floating dock is certainly one so organized in removable sections that every its underwater components can be successively docked because of the continuing to be components for assessment and fixes.
    • The place where a criminal appears in court.
    • Rumex persicarioides, an American species very long confounded because of the golden dock associated with Old World, found on sandy shores from brand new Brunswick to Virginia and westward to Kansas and New Mexico, also from the Pacific coast.
    • Docks tend to be distinguished broadly as damp docks, or those consisting of an inclosed water-space or basin in which ships lie to take or discharge cargo, and which can't be pumped dried out; and dry-docks, where vessels is taken completely away from water. The second tend to be divided into excavated or graving-docks, slip-docks, lifting-docks, and drifting docks. A basin dock is a wet dock whose entry is continuously ready to accept the tide; a closed dock, one whose entry is closed by a lock, caisson, or gate so as to take care of the inside water-level approximately continual. A slip-dock is one in which a vessel is partly hauled from a marine railway in a slip provided with gates which are shut at low tide, excluding the water from vessel. A lifting-dock is one for which a submerged platform by which the ship is landed on blocks and is then raised vertically free from the water aided by the ship by hydraulic power. An off-shore dock is a floating dock with a bottom aud one side wall, maintained in an upright position in the shape of upper and lower synchronous booms connected to the side-wall and powerful vertical articles constructed on the foreshore. A box-dock is a floating dock whose finishes may be shut by caissons or gates following the entry of the vessel, the inside room becoming after that pumped down as in a graving-dock. A balance-dock could be the ordinary sort of floating dock with open finishes, when the side wall space arc used as ballast compartments to keep up the dock in standard balance. A self-docking floating dock is one therefore arranged in detachable sections that every its underwater components is successively docked because of the staying components for assessment and repair works.
    • In railroading, a track at a siding or in a freight yard, having a raised system for each side for convenience in loading at degree of the vehicle home.
    • a platform where trucks or trains may be loaded or unloaded
    • the solid bony area of the end of an animal as distinguished from hair
    • landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships tend to be packed and unloaded or fixed; may have gates to allow water in or out
    • a quick or shortened tail of particular pets
    • a platform built out of the shore in to the liquid and sustained by piles; offers usage of ships and ships
    • In railroading, a track at a siding or perhaps in a freight garden, having a raised platform for each part for convenience in loading at the amount of the car door.
    • an enclosure in a court of law where in fact the defendant sits during test
    • a platform where vehicles or trains may be filled or unloaded
    • any of specific coarse weedy plants with long taproots, often made use of as table greens or in people medication
    • the solid bony an element of the tail of an animal as distinguished from the hair
    • landing in a harbor next to a pier where boats are loaded and unloaded or fixed; might have gates to allow liquid in or out
    • a quick or shortened end of particular animals
    • a platform built right out of the coast to the water and sustained by heaps; provides accessibility boats and boats
    • an enclosure in a court of law where in actuality the defendant sits during trial
    • some of particular coarse weedy flowers with lengthy taproots, occasionally used as table vegetables or perhaps in people medicine
  • verb-transitive:
    • to go (a vessel or vehicle) into or next to a dock.
    • To couple (two or more spacecraft, as an example) in room.
    • To clip brief or cut-off (an animal's tail, for instance).
    • to go (a vessel or vehicle) into or alongside a dock.
    • To few (two or more spacecraft, including) in room.
    • To rob of good results or an integral part of an individual's wages, especially as a punishment: The company docks its staff members for unauthorized absences.
    • To withhold or subtract part from (one's wage or wages).
    • To cut brief or cut-off (an animal's end, including).
    • To deprive of an advantage or a part of one's earnings, especially as a punishment: the organization docks its employees for unauthorized absences.
    • To withhold or deduct a component from (one's salary or earnings).
    • to take off, while the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip.
    • To cut-off a part from; to shorten; to subtract from; to susceptible to a deduction.
    • To cut off, bar, or destroy.
    • to take off, given that end of a thing; to reduce; to reduce quick; to clip.
    • To cut off a component from; to shorten; to subtract from; to susceptible to a deduction.
    • To cut off, bar, or destroy.
    • To draw, legislation, or location (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the base, etc.
    • to-draw, legislation, or location (a ship) in a dock, for fixing, washing the base, etc.
    • To maneuver (a vessel or automobile) into or alongside a dock.
    • To few (several spacecraft, for instance) in room.
    • to go (a vessel or vehicle) into or next to a dock.
    • To couple (a couple of spacecraft, as an example) in area.
    • To cut short or take off (an animal's tail, like).
    • To cut quick or take off (an animal's tail, for instance).
    • To deprive of good results or a part of a person's wages, especially as a punishment: The company docks its employees for unauthorized absences.
    • To rob of good results or an integral part of one's wages, specifically as a punishment: The company docks its staff members for unauthorized absences.
    • To withhold or deduct a part from (one's wage or earnings).
    • To withhold or subtract a part from (one's wage or earnings).
    • to take off, due to the fact end of anything; to reduce; to reduce short; to cut.
    • To cut-off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to at the mercy of a deduction.
    • To cut-off, club, or destroy.
    • To draw, law, or destination (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the base, etc.
    • to cut off, whilst the end of something; to reduce; to reduce short; to cut.
    • To cut-off part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction.
    • To cut off, club, or destroy.
    • To draw, law, or destination (a ship) in a dock, for fixing, washing the base, etc.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • to go or come into a dock.
    • to maneuver or come into a dock.
    • To move or enter into a dock.
    • to maneuver or enter into a dock.
  • idiom:
    • in dock On trial or under intense scrutiny.
    • when you look at the dock On trial or under intense scrutiny.
    • in dock On trial or under intense scrutiny.
    • in the dock On test or under intense scrutiny.
  • verb:
    • To stop a section of an animal's tail.
    • To reduce (earnings); to deduct.
    • To cut off a section of an animal's end.
    • to lessen (earnings); to subtract.
    • To secure at a harbour.
    • to become listed on two moving products.
    • To drag a user screen factor (eg a toolbar) to a position on display where it snaps into location.
    • To land at a harbour.
    • To join two moving things.
    • To pull a person user interface element (such as for instance a toolbar) to a posture on screen in which it snaps into spot.
    • deprive somebody of benefits, as a penalty
    • come right into dock
    • maneuver into a dock
    • remove or shorten the end of an animal
    • deprive somebody of benefits, as a penalty
    • deduct from a person's earnings
    • come into dock
    • maneuver into a dock
    • eliminate or shorten the end of an animal
    • To cut off a section of an animal's end.
    • To cut off a section of an animal's end.
    • to cut back (earnings); to subtract.
    • to cut back (earnings); to deduct.
    • deduct from a person's wages
    • To land at a harbour.
    • To join two going products.
    • To pull a person program factor (like a toolbar) to a situation on screen where it snaps into spot.
    • To secure at a harbour.
    • to participate two going things.
    • To drag a person program element (such as a toolbar) to a situation on screen where it snaps into destination.
    • deprive some one of advantages, as a penalty
    • enter into dock
    • maneuver into a dock
    • remove or shorten the tail of an animal
    • deprive some one of advantages, as a penalty
    • deduct from a person's wages
    • come right into dock
    • maneuver into a dock
    • remove or reduce the tail of an animal
    • deduct from someone's earnings
  • others:
    • To cut-off, because the end of a thing; reduce brief; clip; curtail: as, to dock the end of a horse.
    • thus To deduct a component from; shorten; curtail; diminish: since, to dock a person's wages.
    • To cut-off, given that end of a thing; cut quick; clip; curtail: as, to dock the end of a horse.
    • thus To deduct a component from; shorten; curtail; diminish: because, to dock one's earnings.
    • Nautical, to clue up (a corner of a sail) with regards to hinders the helmsman from seeing: frequently with up.
    • To cut-off, rescind, or destroy; bar: as, to dock an entail.
    • Nautical, to clue up (a large part of a sail) when it hinders the helmsman from seeing: usually with up.
    • To take off, rescind, or destroy; bar: as, to dock an entail.
    • To bring or draw into or devote a dock.
    • In biscuit- (cracker-) making, to prick holes in (each biscuit) before it is devote the range, to present for the escape of moisture.
    • To bring or draw into or devote a dock.
    • In biscuit- (cracker-) making, to prick holes in (each biscuit) before it is added the oven, to give when it comes to escape of dampness.
    • To stop, while the end of anything; cut brief; video; curtail: because, to dock the end of a horse.
    • thus To deduct a component from; shorten; curtail; diminish: because, to dock an individual's earnings.
    • Nautical, to clue up (a large part of a sail) when it hinders the helmsman from seeing: often with up.
    • To cut off, rescind, or destroy; club: as, to dock an entail.
    • To take off, as end of a thing; cut short; clip; curtail: because, to dock the end of a horse.
    • To bring or draw into or invest a dock.
    • Hence To subtract a component from; shorten; curtail; diminish: because, to dock your earnings.
    • Nautical, to clue up (a corner of a sail) with regards to hinders the helmsman from witnessing: generally with up.
    • To cut off, rescind, or destroy; club: as, to dock an entail.
    • In biscuit- (cracker-) making, to prick holes in (each biscuit) before it is place in the range, to deliver for the escape of moisture.
    • to create or draw into or invest a dock.
    • In biscuit- (cracker-) making, to prick holes in (each biscuit) before it is place in the oven, to deliver when it comes to escape of moisture.

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