• Definition for "discontinuity"
    • not enough continuity, logical series, or cohesion.
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  • Sentence for "discontinuity"
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discontinuity definition

  • noun:
    • not enough continuity, logical series, or cohesion.
    • some slack or space.
    • Geology A surface at which seismic wave velocities modification.
    • Mathematics a spot from which a function is defined but is maybe not constant.
    • Mathematics a spot where a function is undefined.
    • too little continuity, regularity or sequence; a rest or space
    • a subterranean software at which seismic velocities change
    • a spot when you look at the number of a function from which it is undefined or perhaps not continuous
    • Want of continuity or cohesion; disunion of components.
    • the actual fact or top-notch being discontinuous; wish of continuity or continuous link; disunion of parts; want of cohesion. See continuity.
    • not enough continuity, rational sequence, or cohesion.
    • a rest or gap.
    • Geology A surface of which seismic trend velocities change.
    • In mathematics, that personality of an alteration which is made up in a passage from point, condition, or value to some other without moving through a continuously unlimited group of advanced points (see limitless); that personality of a function which is made up in an infinitesimal modification associated with factors not everywhere associated with an infinitesimal modification (including no change) regarding the function itself.
    • Mathematics a spot from which a function is defined but is maybe not constant.
    • lack of link or continuity
    • Mathematics a place from which a function is undefined.
    • too little continuity, regularity or series; a rest or gap
    • a subterranean program at which seismic velocities change
    • a place within the array of a function from which it's undefined or perhaps not constant
    • Want of continuity or cohesion; disunion of parts.
    • The fact or top-notch being discontinuous; desire of continuity or uninterrupted connection; disunion of parts; wish of cohesion. See continuity.
    • In math, that personality of an alteration which is made up in a passage from 1 point, condition, or value to another without passing through a continuously infinite a number of advanced things (see limitless); that character of a function which is made up in an infinitesimal modification associated with the variables not being every where combined with an infinitesimal change (including no modification) of this purpose it self.
    • not enough link or continuity
    • decreased continuity, reasonable series, or cohesion.
    • some slack or space.
    • Geology A surface from which seismic revolution velocities change.
    • math a place where a function is defined but is perhaps not continuous.
    • Mathematics a spot where a function is undefined.
    • too little continuity, regularity or sequence; a rest or gap
    • a subterranean software of which seismic velocities modification
    • a spot within the variety of a function of which it is undefined or not continuous
    • desire of continuity or cohesion; disunion of parts.
    • the very fact or quality of becoming discontinuous; wish of continuity or continuous connection; disunion of components; wish of cohesion. See continuity.
    • In math, that personality of a big change which is made up in a passage from a single point, condition, or price to a different without moving through a continuously boundless a number of advanced things (see infinite); that personality of a function which consists in an infinitesimal change regarding the variables not-being every where associated with an infinitesimal change (including no change) associated with function it self.
    • not enough link or continuity
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