dis definition

  • verb-transitive:
    • Informal to demonstrate disrespect to, often by insult or critique: "[The community] is oftentimes dissed for pursuing older, less demographically desirable visitors” ( Michael McWilliams).
    • to treat in a disrespectful fashion; to insult, disparage or belittle.
    • Informal To show disrespect to, usually by insult or criticism: "[The network] is frequently dissed for seeking older, less demographically desirable viewers” ( Michael McWilliams).
    • to take care of in a disrespectful manner; to insult, disparage or belittle.
    • Informal to exhibit disrespect to, often by insult or critique: "[The community] is usually dissed for seeking older, less demographically desirable viewers” ( Michael McWilliams).
    • to deal with in a disrespectful way; to insult, disparage or belittle.
  • verb:
    • alternate spelling of diss.
    • alternate spelling of diss.
    • alternate spelling of diss.
  • noun:
    • alternate type of diss.
    • any one of a team of minor female deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • In Roman mythology, a name often given to Pluto, and hence into the infernal globe.
    • A prefix of Latin origin (various other kinds di-, dif-), in effect— separative or disjunctive, ‘apart,’ ‘asunder,’ ‘in different directions,’ etc., such as distend, dispart, dissident, etc., this force being frequently just indistinctly believed inside English term, like in dispose, dissent, distract, etc., and driving even in Latin into a merely intensive usage, maybe not sensed at all in English, like in dispute; privative or bad, like English un-, reversing or negativing the ancient, as in dissimilar, etc., having come, in this usage, from its frequency in Middle Latin and Old French, to be seen as a consistent English prefix, and as such functional with virtually any verb and adjective, like in disable, disesteem, disfavor, disoblige, disfellowship, etc., plus in colloquial or dialectal used in such types as disremember, disrecollect, etc.
    • An abbreviation of discount.
    • In Norse mythol., a guardian nature.
    • alternate kind of diss.
    • Any of a group of small female deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • In publishing, an abbreviation of distribution, which, lifeless type which can be to be distributed in to the numerous boxes regarding the type-case. See circulation, 3, and distribute, v. i., 2.
    • god of this underworld; equivalent of Greek Pluto
    • In Roman mythology, a name occasionally given to Pluto, thus towards infernal globe.
    • A prefix of Latin origin (various other types di-, dif-), in effect— separative or disjunctive, ‘apart,’ ‘asunder,’ ‘in different guidelines,’ etc., such as distend, dispart, dissident, etc., this power becoming usually only indistinctly believed in the English word, as with dispose, dissent, distract, etc., and passing even in Latin into a merely intensive usage, not thought at all in English, as in dispute; privative or negative, like English un-, reversing or negativing the primitive, as with dissimilar, etc., having come, within use, from its frequency in Middle Latin and Old French, becoming named a regular English prefix, and as such functional with nearly every verb and adjective, such as disable, disesteem, disfavor, disoblige, disfellowship, etc., and in colloquial or dialectal used in these types of forms as disremember, disrecollect, etc.
    • An abbreviation of rebate.
    • In Norse mythol., a guardian spirit.
    • In printing, an abbreviation of distribution, that is, dead type that will be become distributed into the various cardboard boxes for the type-case. See distribution, 3, and distribute, v. i., 2.
    • god of the underworld; counterpart of Greek Pluto
    • Alternative type of diss.
    • some of a team of small feminine deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • In Roman mythology, a name occasionally given to Pluto, and hence to your infernal globe.
    • A prefix of Latin origin (in other forms di-, dif-), in force— separative or disjunctive, ‘apart,’ ‘asunder,’ ‘in different directions,’ etc., as in distend, dispart, dissident, etc., this force being often only indistinctly felt in the English word, as in dispose, dissent, distract, etc., and passing even in Latin into a merely intensive use, not felt at all in English, as in dispute; privative or negative, like the English un-, reversing or negativing the primitive, as in dissimilar, etc., having come, in this use, from its frequency in Middle Latin and Old French, to be recognized as a regular English prefix, and as such usable with almost any verb and adjective, as in disable, disesteem, disfavor, disoblige, disfellowship, etc., and in colloquial or dialectal use in such forms as disremember, disrecollect, etc.
    • An abbreviation of discount.
    • In Norse mythol., a guardian nature.
    • In printing, an abbreviation of circulation, that is, dead kind that is become distributed in to the numerous containers of the type-case. See distribution, 3, and circulate, v. i., 2.
    • god associated with the underworld; counterpart of Greek Pluto
  • determiner:
    • this
    • this
    • this
  • pronoun:
    • this
    • this
    • this

Related Sources

  • Sentence for "dis"
  • Urban Dictionary for "dis"
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