diapason definition

  • noun:
    • a complete, rich outpouring of harmonious sound.
    • the complete variety of a guitar or sound.
    • Either of this two major stops on a pipe organ that form the tonal basis for the entire scale for the instrument.
    • The period therefore the consonance of an octave.
    • A standard indication of pitch.
    • A tuning fork.
    • the number or range of anything, specifically of notes in a scale, or of a particular musical instrument
    • The octave, or period which include most of the tones associated with diatonic scale. Compare disdiapason.
    • Concord, by records an octave apart; harmony.
    • The entire compass of tones; the whole compass of tones of a voice or an instrument.
    • a typical of pitch; a tuning hand.
    • among particular stops inside organ, so named because they stretch through scale of this instrument. They've been of several kinds, as open diapason, stopped diapason, double diapason, and stuff like that.
    • In songs: within the ancient greek language system, the octave.
    • The entire compass of a voice or a guitar.
    • Proper tune or pitch.
    • A rule by which organ-pipes, flutes, etc., are built, in order to produce noises associated with appropriate pitch.
    • a hard and fast standard of pitch, as French diapason typical, in accordance with that the A next above middle C has 435 oscillations per second. See pitch.
    • A tuning-fork.
    • In organ-building, the two principal foundation-stops, called respectively the open diapason and the stopped diapason. The open diapason has metal pipes of large scale, open at the top, giving that full, sonorous, majestic tone which is the typical organ-tone. The stopped diapason has wooden pipes of large scale, stopped at the top by wooden plugs, giving that powerful, flute-like tone which is the typical flute-tone of the organ. The most important mutation-stops of the open-diapason species are the double open diapason, sounding the octave below the key struck; the principal or octave, sounding the octave above; and the fifteenth, sounding the second octave above. Those of the stopped-diapason species are the bourdon, sounding the octave below; the flute, sounding the octave above; and the piccolo, sounding the second octave above. Many varieties of each of these occur. See stop.
    • either associated with two main stops on a pipe organ
    • A full, wealthy outpouring of harmonious sound.
    • the complete range of a musical instrument or sound.
    • Either of this two main stops on a pipe organ that form the tonal basis for your scale of this instrument.
    • The interval and the consonance of an octave.
    • A standard sign of pitch.
    • A tuning fork.
    • the number or range of one thing, specially of records in a scale, or of a particular guitar
    • The octave, or interval including all of the shades of this diatonic scale. Compare disdiapason.
    • Concord, since notes an octave apart; harmony.
    • the whole compass of tones; the entire compass of shades of a voice or a musical instrument.
    • A standard of pitch; a tuning fork.
    • among specific stops within the organ, so-called simply because they extend through scale associated with instrument. They've been of several kinds, as available diapason, stopped diapason, two fold diapason, and stuff like that.
    • In music: in ancient Greek system, the octave.
    • the complete compass of a voice or a musical instrument.
    • Proper tune or pitch.
    • A rule where organ-pipes, flutes, etc., are built, so as to create noises of appropriate pitch.
    • A fixed standard of pitch, since the French diapason typical, relating to that your A next above middle C features 435 oscillations per second. See pitch.
    • A tuning-fork.
    • In organ-building, both main foundation-stops, called respectively the open diapason and also the ended diapason. The open diapason has metal pipelines of large scale, open towards the top, giving that complete, sonorous, majestic tone the typical organ-tone. The ended diapason has actually wood pipes of major, stopped at the top by wood plugs, providing that powerful, flute-like tone the typical flute-tone of the organ. The most important mutation-stops for the open-diapason species will be the double open diapason, sounding the octave below the crucial struck; the principal or octave, sounding the octave above; while the fifteenth, sounding the 2nd octave overhead. Those of the stopped-diapason types would be the bourdon, sounding the octave below; the flute, sounding the octave overhead; and also the piccolo, sounding the second octave overhead. Numerous kinds of all these occur. See stop.
    • either of two main stops on a pipe organ

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