de definition

  • noun:
    • from (operator), it is (operator)
    • The fourth letter of Latin and English alphabets. It's seldom spelled out, becoming typically represented by the quick personality. See D, 1.
    • a Mid-Atlantic condition; one of many original 13 colonies
    • from (operator), this really is (operator)
    • The fourth letter regarding the Latin and English alphabets. It's rarely spelled out, being often represented because of the simple character. See D, 1.
    • a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the initial 13 colonies
  • verb:
    • to complete.
    • doing.
  • others:
    • A French preposition, within English just in a few French phrases, as couleur de rose, or perhaps in proper names, as in Simon de Montfort, Cæur de Lion, De Vere, etc., either of Middle English source, or contemporary and mere French.
    • A Latin preposition, indicating ‘from’ or ‘of,’ happening in a few expressions frequently found in English: as, de novo, anew; de facto, of-fact; de jure, of right.
    • A verb-prefix of Latin origin, expressing in Latin, and hence with modifications in modern speech, various phases of the original meaning ‘from, away from, down from.’
    • In some terms a reduced type of the initial Latin prefix dis-, Latin de- and dis- being in Old French and Middle English pretty much merged in kind and definition (see dis-). See defer, deface, defame, decry, etc.
    • a type of -d, -d, or -ed, -ed in older English, as with solde, tolde, fledde, etc., today extant only in made, the (contracted) preterit and previous participle of make. See -ed, -ed.
    • A French preposition, found in English only in some French phrases, as couleur de rose, or in proper names, as in Simon de Montfort, Cæur de Lion, De Vere, etc., either of Middle English origin, or modern and mere French.
    • A Latin preposition, indicating ‘from’ or ‘of,’ occurring in certain phrases often utilized in English: as, de novo, anew; de facto, of fact; de jure, of right.
    • A verb-prefix of Latin source, expressing in Latin, and hence with customizations in modern-day message, numerous phases of this original meaning ‘from, far from, down from.’
    • in a few terms a lower type of the initial Latin prefix dis-, Latin de- and dis- becoming in Old French and Middle English pretty much merged in kind and definition (see dis-). See defer, deface, defame, decry, etc.
    • a type of -d, -d, or -ed, -ed in older English, such as solde, tolde, fledde, etc., now extant just in made, the (contracted) preterit and past participle of prepare. See -ed, -ed.

Related Sources

  • Sentence for "de"
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  • Urban Dictionary for "de"
    • Toplevel-domain for german websites.
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