dash definition

  • verb-transitive:
    • to split or smash by hitting violently.
    • To hurl, knock, or push with abrupt assault.
    • To splash; bespatter.
    • To write hastily. Often used with off: dashed off a note towards dean.
    • To take in hastily. Usually used in combination with down: dashed down one glass of milk.
    • to include an enlivening or altering element to.
    • To influence with the addition of another element or ingredient to: frozen dessert that was dashed with rum.
    • To destroy or wreck: Our dreams had been dashed. See Synonyms at blast.
    • To confound; abash.
    • To toss with physical violence or haste; resulting in to hit violently or hastily; -- often combined with against.
    • to-break, as by tossing or by collision; to shatter; to crust; to frustrate; to damage.
    • to place to shame; to confound; to confuse; to abash; to depress.
    • To throw in or on in an immediate, reckless manner; to combine, decrease, or adulterate, by throwing in anything of a substandard high quality; to overspread partially; to bespatter; to touch every now and then
    • to create or sketch quickly or carelessly; to execute quickly, or with careless haste; -- with off.
    • To erase by a stroke; to strike out; knock out; -- without.
    • to-break or smash by striking violently.
    • To hurl, hit, or thrust with sudden physical violence.
    • To splash; bespatter.
    • to create hastily. Frequently combined with off: dashed down an email towards dean.
    • To drink hastily. Usually used with down: dashed down one glass of milk.
    • To add an enlivening or altering factor to.
    • To impact by the addition of another factor or ingredient to: ice-cream that has been dashed with rum.
    • To destroy or wreck: Our fantasies were dashed. See Synonyms at blast.
    • To confound; abash.
    • To put with assault or haste; resulting in to strike violently or hastily; -- often combined with against.
    • to split, as by putting or by collision; to shatter; to crust; to frustrate; to damage.
    • to place to shame; to confound; to confuse; to abash; to depress.
    • To throw-in or on in an instant, reckless way; to mix, lower, or adulterate, by throwing in one thing of a substandard high quality; to overspread partly; to bespatter; to the touch here and there
    • To form or sketch quickly or carelessly; to perform rapidly, or with reckless haste; -- with off.
    • To remove by a stroke; to strike-out; knock out; -- with out.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To strike violently; smash.
    • to maneuver with haste; dash: dashed into door.
    • To rush with assault; to maneuver impetuously; to hit violently.
    • To hit violently; smash.
    • to go with haste; rush: dashed toward door.
    • To rush with assault; to maneuver impetuously; to strike violently.
  • noun:
    • A swift, violent blow or stroke: knocked the books on floor with an impatient dash of their hand.
    • A splash.
    • A small amount of an additional ingredient: a dash of sherry.
    • a fast swing, as with a pencil or brush.
    • a rapid action; a rush: made a dash for exit.
    • Sports A footrace, typically lower than a quarter-mile lengthy, operate at top rate from outset.
    • A spirited quality doing his thing or style; verve. See Synonyms at vitality.
    • Either of two signs, an emdash or an endash, used in writing plus printing.
    • In Morse and comparable rules, the lengthy sound or signal used in combination because of the dot and silent periods to portray letters or numbers.
    • A dashboard.
    • the following symbols: ‒ (figure dash), – (en dash), — (em dash), or ― (horizontal bar).
    • a quick run.
    • a little volume of a liquid material; lower than 1/8 of a teaspoon.
    • A dashboard.
    • among two signs of Morse signal.
    • A bribe or gratuity.
    • Violent striking collectively of two bodies; collision; crash.
    • a rapid check; abashment; frustration; spoil.
    • a small admixture, infusion, or adulteration; a partial overspreading
    • an instant activity, esp. one of quick length of time; a fast stroke or blow; a sudden onset or rush
    • Energy in style or action; cartoon; nature.
    • A vain tv show; a blustering parade; a flourish.
    • A mark or range [--], written down or publishing, denoting a-sudden break, end, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt improvement in its construction, a long or considerable pause, or an urgent or epigrammatic turn of belief. Dashes are sometimes used rather than scars or parenthesis.
    • the hallmark of staccato, a little level [�] denoting your note over which its placed is to be performed in a brief, distinct way.
    • The range attracted through a figure into the thorough bass, as a direction to boost the interval a semitone.
    • a brief, spirited energy or test of speed upon a race course; -- found in horse race, when one trial comprises the competition.
    • A violent striking collectively of two-bodies; collision.
    • an abrupt check; disappointment; abashment: as, their hopes came across with a dash.
    • An impetuous activity; a fast stroke or blow; an abrupt onset: because, which will make a dash upon the adversary.
    • A small infusion or admixture; one thing mingled with something else, particularly to be considered or adulterate it: as, the wine has a dash of water.
    • the ability for unhesitating, prompt activity, as against an enemy; vigor in attack: as, the corps had been distinguished for dash.
    • A flourish; an ostentatious parade.
    • on paper and publishing, a horizontal stroke or type of differing size, utilized as a mark of punctuation as well as various other purposes; especially, in publishing, a kind the facial skin of which comes with such a line.
    • In printing, in addition, a line (variously modified in type) utilized for the split of distinct portions of matter, while the synchronous dash , the double dash , the diamond or swell dash , etc.
    • Any brief level or line.
    • In songs: The quick swing placed over or under a note in which a staccato effect is suggested. See staccato.
    • The line or stroke attracted through a figure in thoroughbass which suggests that the tone signified because of the figure is to be chromatically raised a semitone.
    • In harpsichord-music, a coulé (which see).
    • In zoology, a longitudinal mark, generally speaking rounded and obviously defined at one end, and tapering or gradually becoming indistinct on other, as if from a drop of coloured liquid dashed obliquely against the surface, or by the rough stroke of a pen. Such markings have become typical on wings for the Lepidoptera.
    • something special made by a trader to a chief on western coast of Africa to secure permission to traffic utilizing the locals.
    • Same as dash-board.
    • In sporting, a brief race decided in a single attempt, perhaps not in warms: since, a hundred-yard dash.
    • A present or gratuity; a cumshaw.
    • a punctuation mark (-) made use of between elements of a compound word or amongst the syllables of a word once the word is divided after a line of text
    • the longer of two telegraphic signals utilized in Morse rule
    • an instant run
    • the act of moving with great haste
    • unique and trendy style
    • a footrace run at top rate
    • A swift, violent blow or swing: knocked the publications to your floor with an impatient dash of his hand.
    • A splash.
    • handful of an extra ingredient: a dash of sherry.
    • an instant swing, as with a pencil or brush.
    • an abrupt activity; a rush: made a dash for the exit.
    • Sports A footrace, often lower than a quarter-mile long, operate at top speed from the outset.
    • A spirited quality in action or style; verve. See Synonyms at vigor.
    • Either of two symbols, an emdash or an endash, utilized in writing and in publishing.
    • In Morse and similar codes, the long sound or sign used in combination using the dot and hushed intervals to portray letters or figures.
    • A dashboard.
    • Any of the following symbols: ‒ (figure dash), – (en dash), — (em dash), or ― (horizontal bar).
    • a quick run.
    • a little volume of a liquid material; less than 1/8 of a teaspoon.
    • A dashboard.
    • among the two symbols of Morse signal.
    • A bribe or gratuity.
    • Violent hitting together of two-bodies; collision; crash.
    • an abrupt check; abashment; disappointment; ruin.
    • A slight admixture, infusion, or adulteration; a partial overspreading
    • A rapid activity, esp. among quick length; a fast stroke or blow; a rapid onset or dash
    • Energy however you like or activity; animation; nature.
    • A vain program; a blustering parade; a flourish.
    • A mark or range [--], written down or printing, denoting an abrupt break, stop, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt change in its construction, a lengthy or significant pause, or an unexpected or epigrammatic turn of sentiment. Dashes are also occasionally used instead of markings or parenthesis.
    • The sign of staccato, a tiny level [�] denoting your note over which its placed is to be done in a quick, distinct fashion.
    • The line drawn through a figure inside comprehensive bass, as a direction to improve the interval a semitone.
    • a brief, spirited energy or trial of speed upon a race program; -- used in horse racing, when just one trial constitutes the race.
    • A violent striking together of two-bodies; collision.
    • an abrupt check; frustration; abashment: as, his hopes met with a dash.
    • An impetuous movement; a fast stroke or blow; a-sudden beginning: because, in order to make a dash upon the enemy.
    • A small infusion or admixture; some thing mingled with another thing, particularly to be considered or adulterate it: as, the wine has actually a dash of liquid.
    • the ability for unhesitating, prompt activity, as against an enemy; vigor in attack: as, the corps ended up being distinguished for dash.
    • A flourish; an ostentatious parade.
    • written down and publishing, a horizontal stroke or line of varying length, used as a mark of punctuation as well as various other purposes; particularly, in printing, a kind the face that contains these types of a line.
    • In printing, in addition, a line (variously modified in kind) used for the separation of distinct portions of matter, whilst the parallel dash , the double dash , the diamond or swell dash , etc.
    • Any short mark or line.
    • In songs: The short swing put over or under a note through which a staccato result is suggested. See staccato.
    • The line or swing drawn through a figure in thoroughbass which shows the tone signified by the figure is usually to be chromatically raised a semitone.
    • In harpsichord-music, a coulé (which see).
    • In zoology, a longitudinal mark, generally curved and plainly defined at one end, and tapering or gradually getting indistinct in the various other, like produced by a drop of coloured fluid dashed obliquely from the surface, or because of the rough swing of a pen. Such scars are particularly common in the wings regarding the Lepidoptera.
    • a present-day made by a trader to a chief in the western coast of Africa to secure permission to traffic with the locals.
    • Same as dash-board.
    • In sporting, a brief battle decided in one single attempt, maybe not in heats: because, a hundred-yard dash.
    • something special or gratuity; a cumshaw.
    • a punctuation level (-) used between parts of a compound word or between your syllables of a word as soon as the term is split at the end of a line of text
    • the longer of two telegraphic signals used in Morse rule
    • a fast run
    • the work of moving with great haste
    • distinctive and stylish beauty
    • a footrace run at top rate
  • verb:
    • To run rapidly or even for a brief length.
    • To leave or depart.
    • To destroy by striking (against).
    • To throw violently.
    • To sprinkle; to splatter.
    • To destroy; to destroy.
    • To dishearten; to sadden.
    • To complete hastily, frequently with down or down.
    • to-draw rapidly; jot
    • add an enlivening or modifying element to
    • cause to get rid of nerve
    • break in to pieces, as by striking or slamming over
    • obliterate or break
    • run or move rapidly or hastily
    • hurl or thrust violently
    • To run rapidly and for a brief distance.
    • to go out of or leave.
    • To destroy by striking (against).
    • To put violently.
    • To sprinkle; to splatter.
    • To ruin; to destroy.
    • To dishearten; to sadden.
    • To complete hastily, generally with down or off.
    • to-draw rapidly; jot
    • add an enlivening or altering element to
    • cause to reduce nerve
    • break right into pieces, as by striking or knocking over
    • destroy or break
    • operate or move rapidly or hastily
    • hurl or pushed violently
  • others:
    • To hit out of the blue and violently; give a rapid blow to.
    • To cause to strike suddenly and with violence; throw or thrust violently or suddenly: as, to dash one stone against another; to dash water on the face.
    • to split by collision or by strokes; shatter.
    • To scatter or sprinkle one thing over; bespatter; sprinkle; splash; suffuse.
    • to put, make, mark, design, etc., in a hasty manner.
    • To put anything into so as to produce a mixture; mingle; combine; adulterate: as, to dash wine with water; the storyline is dashed with fables; to dash fire-damp with pure environment (said in coal-mining: see father).
    • To throw down; pushed completely or apart; impede; frustrate; abate; reduced.
    • To confound; mistake; put to pity; abash: because, he had been dashed at the appearance associated with judge.
    • To remove at a stroke; strike-out; blot down or obliterate: because, to dash out a line or a word.
    • To strike-out or form at a blow; produce abruptly.
    • Synonyms Dash, Smash, Shatter, Shiver, Crush, Mash. Whatever is dashed doesn't fundamentally go to pieces: if it's broken, the fact is commonly expressed. Whatever is smashed, shattered, or shivered is dashed to pieces all of a sudden, with violence, at a blow or perhaps in a collision. Smashing is the roughest and a lot of violent of this three functions; the word expresses more complete disturbance or ruin: as, the drunken soldier smashed (shattered,' shivered) the mirror because of the butt of their musket. The usage of smash or mash for crush (because, their head ended up being smashed, I mashed my finger) is colloquial. Shatter and shiver differ in that shatter implies rather the flying of this parts, and shiver the busting associated with the material; and also the pieces tend to be more many or smaller with shiver. Whatever is crushed or mashed is broken-down under some pressure; that which is mashed becomes a shapeless size: sugar and rock are crushed into powder, little particles, or bits; apples tend to be crushed or mashed into pulp in creating cider; boiled potatoes tend to be mashed, maybe not crushed, in planning them when it comes to table.
    • To rush with physical violence; move rapidly and vehemently.
    • to make use of rapidity in performance, so as to show power apparently without care, like in painting or writing.
    • To hit suddenly and violently; provide a-sudden blow to.
    • To cause to hit all of a sudden sufficient reason for assault; put or thrust violently or instantly: because, to dash one rock against another; to dash water regarding the face.
    • to split by collision or by shots; shatter.
    • To scatter or sprinkle something over; bespatter; sprinkle; splash; suffuse.
    • to put, make, level, sketch, etc., in a hasty way.
    • To toss one thing into in order to produce a combination; mingle; combine; adulterate: as, to dash wine with liquid; the storyline is dashed with fables; to dash fire-damp with pure atmosphere (said in coal-mining: see father).
    • To throw down; pushed completely or apart; impede; frustrate; abate; lower.
    • To confound; confuse; placed to pity; abash: because, he was dashed at the appearance of judge.
    • To remove at a stroke; strike-out; blot completely or obliterate: because, to dash out a line or a word.
    • To strike out or form at a blow; produce instantly.
    • Synonyms Dash, Smash, Shatter, Shiver, Crush, Mash. What is dashed will not always visit pieces: if it's damaged, the truth is commonly expressed. What is smashed, shattered, or shivered is dashed to pieces unexpectedly, with physical violence, at a blow or perhaps in a collision. Smashing could be the roughest & most violent for the three functions; the phrase conveys more total disruption or harm: because, the drunken soldier smashed (shattered,' shivered) the mirror with the butt of his musket. Employing smash or mash for crush (as, their mind ended up being smashed, I mashed my little finger) is colloquial. Shatter and shiver vary in that shatter recommends instead the traveling regarding the components, and shiver the breaking associated with the compound; in addition to pieces tend to be more many or smaller with shiver. Whatever is broken or mashed is separated under some pressure; whatever is mashed becomes a shapeless size: sugar and stone are crushed into dust, tiny particles, or bits; apples are crushed or mashed into pulp to make cider; boiled potatoes tend to be mashed, maybe not crushed, in preparing all of them for table.
    • To hurry with violence; move quickly and vehemently.
    • to utilize rapidity in performance, in order to display force seemingly without treatment, as with painting or writing.

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