combining form definition

  • noun:
    • A modified form of an independent word occurring just in conjunction with terms, affixes, or any other incorporating kinds to create compounds or types, as electro- (from electric) in electromagnet or geo- (from Greek geō-, from gē "earth”) in geochemistry.
    • A form of a word useful for incorporating with other terms or any other incorporating types to help make brand-new terms. A combining form may conjoin with a completely independent word (e.g., mini- + dress), another combining form (e.g., image- + -graphy) or an affix (e.g., cephal + -ic); it's therefore distinguished from an affix, which are often included with either a free term or a combining form not exclusively to a different affix (e.g., Iceland + -ic but not pro- + -ic). It's also distinguished historically from an affix if it is borrowed from another language for which it's descriptively a word (e.g., the French mal provided the English mal- in malodorous) or a combining kind (age.g., the Greek kako-, a combining as a type of kakos, provided the English caco- in cacography).
    • In computer typography, the form of an accent which can be coupled with various other characters, as opposed to an individual personality that features the accent.
    • a bound form used only in compounds
    • A modified as a type of an independent word that occurs just in combination with terms, affixes, or other incorporating types to form substances or derivatives, as electro- (from electric) in electromagnet or geo- (from Greek geō-, from gē "earth”) in geochemistry.
    • a kind of a word used for combining along with other words or other combining kinds to create new words. A combining form may conjoin with a completely independent term (e.g., mini- + top), another combining kind (e.g., picture- + -graphy) or an affix (age.g., cephal + -ic); it really is hence distinguished from an affix, which may be included with either a free of charge term or a combining kind yet not exclusively to some other affix (e.g., Iceland + -ic yet not pro- + -ic). It can also be distinguished historically from an affix when it is lent from another language by which its descriptively a word (age.g., the French mal gave the English mal- in malodorous) or a combining kind (age.g., the Greek kako-, a combining type of kakos, gave the English caco- in cacography).
    • In computer typography, the form of an accent that can be combined with other characters, rather than just one character that features the accent.
    • a bound form used only in substances
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