chorus definition

  • noun:
    • Music A composition frequently in four or higher components written for most vocalists.
    • songs A refrain where other individuals, particularly audience people, join a soloist in a song.
    • songs A line or set of outlines duplicated at periods in a song.
    • songs A solo part in line with the primary melody of a well known song and played by an associate associated with group.
    • songs A body of vocalists who perform choral compositions, frequently having one or more singer per component.
    • Music A body of vocalists and dancers just who support the soloists and leading performers in operas, musical comedies, and revues.
    • A group of persons who speak or sing-in unison a given component or composition in drama or poetry recitation.
    • An actor in Elizabethan crisis who recites the prologue and epilogue to a play and quite often comments in the action.
    • a small grouping of masked performers who performed ceremonial tracks at spiritual celebrations in early Greek times.
    • The group in a classical Greek crisis whoever tracks and dances provide an exposition of or, in later on tradition, a disengaged commentary regarding the action.
    • The part of a classical Greek drama comprising choric party and track.
    • a bunch or performer in a modern drama providing an objective much like the Greek chorus.
    • The performers of a choral ode, specially a Pindaric ode.
    • A speech, track, or other utterance made in concert by many individuals.
    • A simultaneous utterance by many people: a chorus of jeers through the bystanders.
    • The noises therefore made.
    • a small grouping of vocalists and performers in spiritual festivals of ancient Greece
    • A group of people in a play or overall performance which recite collectively.
    • a small grouping of singers; singing team whom perform together.
    • A repeated part of a song, also called the refrain.
    • A setting or function in digital music which makes one vocals sound like numerous.
    • several people or creatures whom make sounds collectively
    • An actor who checks out the orifice and closing outlines of a play.
    • A band of singers and dancers.
    • A company of people likely to observe just what passed inside acts of a tragedy, and sing the sentiments that the occasions proposed in couplets or verses amongst the functions; also, whatever was thus sung because of the chorus.
    • An interpreter in a dumb show or play.
    • A company of singers singing in show.
    • A composition of a couple of components, every one of that will be meant to be sung by a number of sounds.
    • components of a song or hymn continual at intervals, as at the end of stanzas; additionally, a company of vocalists which join with the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing these types of components.
    • The simultaneous of an organization in any noisy demonstration.
    • A dance. Specifically, inside ancient greek language drama— a-dance carried out by several individuals in a ring, honoring Bacchus, followed closely by the performing of this sacred dithyrambic odes. Out of this easy rite originated the Greek drama, In extension of very early tradition, an organization of people, represented by age, sex, and estate appropriate towards play, which took part through their frontrunner, the coryphæus, utilizing the actors in the dialogue of a drama, and sang their particular sentiments at reported intervals whenever no star was from the phase.
    • the songs executed because of the chorus.
    • In songs: an organization of vocalists, specially an organized company, such singers in a church or a choral society, In an oratorio, opera, or concert, the typical business of vocalists, as distinguished through the soloists, part of a song in which the audience join with the singer; a refrain; in addition, any continual refrain or burden, A musical structure meant to be sung in harmony by an organization of singers, generally by four voices. A double chorus is for eight voices, The chemical or mixture stops of an organ. In tenth century, a guitar, possibly the bagpipe, Inside fifteenth century, the drone of a bagpipe or of accompaniment strings of the crowd. Formerly, in Scotland, a loud trumpet.
    • A union of voices or noises, or an organization of persons, resembling a chorus.
    • In zoology, a genus of mollusks.
    • any utterance produced at the same time by an organization
    • the part of a song where a soloist is accompanied by a group of vocalists
    • a team of folks put together to sing together
    • a company of stars just who remark (by talking or performing together) regarding the action in a classical Greek play
    • a body of dancers or singers whom perform collectively
    • songs A composition typically in four or higher parts written for a lot of vocalists.
    • songs A refrain which other individuals, such audience users, join a soloist in a song.
    • songs A line or group of outlines repeated at periods in a song.
    • songs A solo section based on the primary melody of a favorite track and played by a member of group.
    • songs A body of vocalists which perform choral compositions, generally having more than one singer per part.
    • Music A body of vocalists and performers whom offer the soloists and leading performers in operas, music comedies, and revues.
    • A group of individuals who talk or sing in unison certain component or structure in crisis or poetry recitation.
    • An actor in Elizabethan crisis whom recites the prologue and epilogue to a play and often feedback in the activity.
    • a team of masked performers just who performed ceremonial tracks at spiritual celebrations in early Greek times.
    • The group in a classical Greek crisis whose songs and dances present an exposition of or, in later on custom, a disengaged commentary regarding the activity.
    • The portion of a classical Greek crisis composed of choric party and tune.
    • an organization or performer in a modern crisis offering an intention like the Greek chorus.
    • The performers of a choral ode, particularly a Pindaric ode.
    • A speech, track, or other utterance produced in show by many individuals.
    • A simultaneous utterance by a number of people: a chorus of jeers through the bystanders.
    • The sounds so made.
    • several vocalists and dancers within the religious celebrations of ancient Greece
    • A group of men and women in a play or overall performance who recite together.
    • a small grouping of vocalists; performing team who perform collectively.
    • A repeated section of a song, also referred to as the refrain.
    • A setting or function in electronic songs that makes one voice appear to be many.
    • a small grouping of people or creatures which make noises together
    • An actor just who checks out the opening and closing outlines of a play.
    • A band of singers and dancers.
    • an organization of persons supposed to observe what passed within the acts of a tragedy, and also to sing the sentiments that the activities recommended in couplets or passages between the functions; additionally, what ended up being therefore sung by the chorus.
    • An interpreter in a dumb tv show or play.
    • a business of singers singing in concert.
    • A composition of two or more parts, each of which will be designed to be sung by a number of voices.
    • elements of a song or hymn recurring at intervals, as at the conclusion of stanzas; in addition, a company of vocalists just who join utilizing the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing such parts.
    • The simultaneous of a company in every loud demonstration.
    • A dance. Particularly, when you look at the ancient greek language drama— A dance performed by several persons in a ring, in honor of Bacchus, followed by the singing of the sacred dithyrambic odes. Using this simple rite originated the Greek crisis, In extension of the early tradition, a company of individuals, represented since age, sex, and estate proper towards play, whom took part through their particular leader, the coryphæus, aided by the actors when you look at the discussion of a drama, and sang their particular sentiments at reported intervals when no actor had been on phase.
    • one of many tracks performed because of the chorus.
    • In songs: A company of vocalists, specially an organized organization, eg singers in a church or a choral culture, In an oratorio, opera, or concert, the typical company of singers, as distinguished from the soloists, an integral part of a song where audience join using singer; a refrain; also, any recurring refrain or burden, A musical composition meant to be sung in harmony by an organization of vocalists, generally by four voices. A double chorus is actually for eight voices, The ingredient or mixture stops of an organ. In tenth century, an instrument, probably the bagpipe, In the fifteenth century, the drone of a bagpipe or regarding the accompaniment strings regarding the crowd. Previously, in Scotland, a loud trumpet.
    • A union of voices or noises, or a business of individuals, resembling a chorus.
    • In zoology, a genus of mollusks.
    • any utterance created at the same time by a bunch
    • the element of a song in which a soloist is accompanied by a team of singers
    • a small grouping of individuals assembled to sing collectively
    • a business of stars just who comment (by speaking or performing together) on activity in a classical Greek play
    • a body of performers or vocalists just who perform together
  • verb-transitive:
    • To sing or utter in or like in chorus.
    • To sing or utter in or as if in chorus.
  • idiom:
    • in chorus completely; in unison.
    • in chorus altogether; in unison.
  • verb:
    • To echo a certain sentiment.
    • To sing the chorus.
    • utter together
    • sing in a choir
    • To echo a specific sentiment.
    • To sing the chorus.
    • total together
    • sing-in a choir
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To sing-in chorus; to exclaim simultaneously.
    • To sing in chorus; to exclaim at the same time.
  • others:
    • To sing or interact the chorus of: as, to chorus a song.
    • To exclaim or call out in concert.
    • To sing or participate in the chorus of: as, to chorus a song.
    • To exclaim or call-out in show.

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