chant definition

  • noun:
    • a quick, easy variety of syllables or words which are sung on or intoned toward exact same note or a limited variety of records.
    • A canticle or prayer sung or intoned in this way.
    • A song or melody.
    • A monotonous rhythmic call or shout, at the time of a slogan: the chant regarding the audience within rally.
    • Type of performing done generally without tools and balance.
    • Song; melody.
    • A short and easy melody, divided in to two components by two fold taverns, that unmetrical psalms, etc., tend to be sung or recited. It's the most ancient kind of choral songs.
    • A psalm, etc., organized for chanting.
    • Twang; manner of speaking; a canting tone.
    • A vocal melody; a song; especially, now, one that's solemn, sluggish, or monotonous.
    • particularly— A melody composed within the Ambrosian or Gregorian design, after one of several ecclesiastical modes, having frequently an email for each syllable, and without a strict rhythmical structure: sometimes known as a tone; whenever utilized in contrapuntal composition, labeled as a canto fermo. A Gregorian melody, frequently of old beginning, meant to be properly used with a prose text in several verses, a number of syllables in each verse being recited or intoned upon a single note. A Gregorian chant with this type has actually five components: the intonation, initial prominent or reciting-note, the mediation, the second dominant or reciting-note, as well as the closing or cadence. A brief composition in seven steps, initial and 4th which contain but one note, whose time-value may be extended at will to be able to accompany a few syllables or words, while the continuing to be measures are sung in strict rhythm: frequently known as an Anglican chant, because most thoroughly used in the solutions associated with the Anglican Church when it comes to canticles and psalms. An Anglican chant is made of two components, the initial of three plus the second of four measures; each one half begins with a reciting-note and concludes with a cadence; the first cadence normally called the mediation. A double chant is equal long to two typical or solitary chants, that's, contains fourteen actions, four reciting-notes, etc. The distribution of this words of a text to be used with a chant is known as pointing (which see). The Anglican chant might be a modernized type of the Gregorian, without an intonation, having the mediation and cadence made strictly rhythmical, and following modern-day ideas of tonality and equilibrium, Any short structure a number of of whose records are extended at might in order to come with several syllables or terms.
    • previously in addition spelled chaunt.
    • a repetitive tune for which as much syllables as necessary tend to be assigned to just one tone
    • A short, easy a number of syllables or terms which are sung on or intoned on exact same note or a finite array of records.
    • A canticle or prayer sung or intoned this way.
    • A song or melody.
    • A monotonous rhythmic call or shout, at the time of a slogan: the chant for the audience at the rally.
    • particular performing done usually without devices and equilibrium.
    • tune; melody.
    • a brief and simple melody, divided in to two components by double taverns, that unmetrical psalms, etc., are sung or recited. It will be the many ancient type of choral music.
    • A psalm, etc., organized for chanting.
    • Twang; method of speaking; a canting tone.
    • A vocal melody; a song; especially, now, one that is solemn, slow, or monotonous.
    • Specifically— A melody composed in Ambrosian or Gregorian style, following the ecclesiastical settings, having usually a note for every single syllable, and without a strict rhythmical structure: often called a tone; whenever found in contrapuntal structure, called a canto fermo. A Gregorian melody, often of ancient source, designed to be utilized with a prose text in lot of passages, a few syllables in each verse being recited or intoned upon an individual note. A Gregorian chant with this kind features five parts: the intonation, the first principal or reciting-note, the mediation, the second prominent or reciting-note, and also the closing or cadence. A quick composition in seven actions, the very first and fourth of which have but one note, whoever time-value could be extended at will in order to come with a number of syllables or terms, although the continuing to be steps are sung in strict rhythm: frequently called an Anglican chant, because most extensively used in the services of Anglican Church when it comes to canticles while the psalms. An Anglican chant consist of two parts, the first of three and second of four actions; each half starts with a reciting-note and comes to an end with a cadence; the initial cadence can be called the mediation. A double chant is equal in length to two typical or single chants, this is certainly, includes fourteen actions, four reciting-notes, etc. The circulation regarding the terms of a text for usage with a chant is known as pointing (which see). The Anglican chant is probably a modernized form of the Gregorian, without an intonation, having the mediation and cadence made strictly rhythmical, and after the contemporary ideas of tonality and balance, Any brief structure more than one of whose notes could be extended at might so as to accompany several syllables or words.
    • previously also spelled chaunt.
    • a repetitive tune by which as much syllables as essential tend to be assigned to a single tone
  • verb-transitive:
    • To sing or intone to a chant: chant a prayer.
    • To commemorate in track: chanting a hero's deeds.
    • to express in the way of a chant: chanted defiant slogans.
    • To utter with a melodious sound; to sing.
    • To commemorate in track.
    • To sing or recite after the method of a chant, or to a tune known as a chant.
    • To sing or intone to a chant: chant a prayer.
    • To celebrate in song: chanting a hero's deeds.
    • to state in the manner of a chant: chanted defiant slogans.
    • To utter with a melodious voice; to sing.
    • To celebrate in song.
    • To sing or recite following the method of a chant, or to a tune called a chant.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To sing, especially in the way of a chant: chanted while a pal hopped line.
    • To speak monotonously.
    • to produce melody using the voice; to sing.
    • To sing, like in reciting a chant.
    • To sing, especially in the manner of a chant: chanted while a pal hopped line.
    • To speak monotonously.
    • To make melody because of the sound; to sing.
    • To sing, as in reciting a chant.
  • verb:
    • To sing, specially without devices, so that as applied to monophonic and pre-modern songs.
    • complete monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically
    • recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm
    • To sing, particularly without instruments, and as applied to monophonic and pre-modern music.
    • utter monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically
    • recite with music intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm
  • others:
    • To sing; warble; utter with a melodious sound.
    • To commemorate in tune: as, to chant the praises of Jehovah.
    • To sing, as in the church solution, in a mode between air and recitative. See chant, n.
    • To sing; make melody utilizing the vocals.
    • To sing psalms, canticles, etc., like in the church solution, following the manner of a chant.
    • going completely weep: stated of hounds.
    • To sing; warble; utter with a melodious voice.
    • To commemorate in tune: as, to chant the praises of Jehovah.
    • To sing, such as the chapel solution, in a method between atmosphere and recitative. See chant, n.
    • To sing; make melody because of the sound.
    • To sing psalms, canticles, etc., such as the church service, following the method of a chant.
    • To go in full cry: stated of hounds.

Related Sources

  • Definition for "chant"
    • a quick, easy variety of syllables or words…
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  • Sentence for "chant"
    • Did the rain chant several friends…
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  • Quotes for "chant"
  • Phrases for "chant"
  • Cross Reference for "chant"
  • Equivalent for "chant"
  • Etymologically Related for "chant"
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