censure definition

  • noun:
    • a manifestation of powerful disapproval or harsh critique.
    • An official rebuke, as by a legislature of 1 of its people.
    • The act of blaming, criticizing, or condemning because incorrect; reprehension.
    • An official reprimand.
    • their state of excommunication.
    • Judgment either positive or undesirable; viewpoint.
    • The act of blaming or finding fault with and condemning as wrong; reprehension; blame.
    • Judicial or ecclesiastical sentence or reprimand; condemnatory wisdom.
    • Judgment; opinion.
    • a manifestation of strong disapproval or harsh critique.
    • the state rebuke, as by a legislature of 1 of its members.
    • The work of blaming, criticizing, or condemning as incorrect; reprehension.
    • Judicial phrase; formal condemnation.
    • Eccles., a penalty enforced upon an offender.
    • An official reprimand.
    • The state of excommunication.
    • The act of criticizing, particularly of finding fault; criticism; expression of fault or disapprobation; faultfinding; condemnation; animadversion.
    • A custom which formerly prevailed in several manors in Cornwall and Devonshire, The united kingdomt, by which all of the inhabitants above the age sixteen were summoned to swear fealty towards lord for the manor, to pay for eleven pence per poll, and a cent annually ever after as censemoney or typical good. The people thus sworn had been known as censers.
    • Synonyms Admonition, Monition, etc. (identify admonition), stricture, reprobation, disapproval, expression, dispraise, reproval.
    • Judgment either positive or bad; opinion.
    • The work of blaming or finding fault with and condemning because incorrect; reprehension; blame.
    • Judicial or ecclesiastical phrase or reprimand; condemnatory view.
    • the state of being excommunicated
    • harsh criticism or disapproval
    • Judgment; viewpoint.
    • Judicial sentence; formal condemnation.
    • Eccles., a penalty imposed upon an offender.
    • The work of criticizing, especially of finding fault; critique; phrase of fault or disapprobation; faultfinding; condemnation; animadversion.
    • a customized which previously prevailed in many manors in Cornwall and Devonshire, England, wherein all residents over the chronilogical age of sixteen had been summoned to swear fealty into the lord for the manor, to pay for eleven pence per poll, and a penny per year ever before after as censemoney or common fine. The persons hence sworn had been called censers.
    • Synonyms Admonition, Monition, etc. (see admonition), stricture, reprobation, disapproval, reflection, dispraise, reproval.
    • the state to be excommunicated
    • harsh criticism or disapproval
  • verb-transitive:
    • To criticize seriously; fault. See Synonyms at criticize.
    • To Convey official disapproval of: "whether the Senate will censure among its users for conflict of interest” ( Washington Article).
    • To criticize severely; fault. See Synonyms at criticize.
    • To State formal disapproval of: "whether the Senate will censure among its people for dispute of great interest” ( Washington Post).
  • verb:
    • to criticize harshly
    • to officially rebuke
    • to criticize harshly
    • to formally rebuke
    • rebuke officially
    • rebuke officially
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To form or express a judgment in regards to; to estimate; to evaluate.
    • To find fault with and condemn as wrong; the culprit; expressing disapprobation of.
    • To condemn or reprimand by a judicial or ecclesiastical phrase.
    • To judge.
    • to make or express a judgment regarding; to approximate; to evaluate.
    • locate fault with and condemn as incorrect; to blame; to express disapprobation of.
    • To condemn or reprimand by a judicial or ecclesiastical sentence.
    • to evaluate.
  • others:
    • To calculate; reckon; regard; consider.
    • to evaluate; adjudge; pass view in; phrase.
    • Eccles., to discipline by general public rebuke, etc. See censure, n., 3.
    • To criticize, especially adversely; find fault with and condemn; fault; present disapprobation of: as, to censure a person, or their ways or conduct; to censure a novel.
    • Synonyms Reprove, Rebuke, Reprimand, Censure, Remonstrate with, Expostulate with, Reproach, chide, reprehend, decide to try task, price, berate, scold, upbraid, lecture. To reprove is admonish with disapprobation. To rebuke is to reprove highly or dramatically. To reprimand is always to reprove formally; it is the work of one having authority. To censure is always to show an unfavorable viewpoint; its less personal as compared to earlier terms. Remonstrate with and expostulate with tend to be more argumentative and imply a lot more of guidance than either reprove or censure; in addition they apply simply to acts today happening or around to happen, while censure is applicable only to what is previous. To reproach you were to lay fault upon him in direct target, and with experience, to try to shame him with what he has done. The words advance within the amount of chance that the person reproved, etc., will not acknowledge the fault that he could be taken up to task. Look at difference of corresponding nouns under admonition.
    • to pass through an impression, specifically a severe opinion; judge: followed closely by of or on.
    • To approximate; reckon; regard; consider.
    • to evaluate; adjudge; pass judgment in; phrase.
    • Eccles., to discipline by public rebuke, etc. See censure, n., 3.
    • To criticize, especially adversely; discover fault with and condemn; fault; express disapprobation of: as, to censure a person, or his manners or conduct; to censure a novel.
    • Synonyms Reprove, Rebuke, Reprimand, Censure, Remonstrate with, Expostulate with, Reproach, chide, reprehend, take to task, price, berate, scold, upbraid, lecture. To reprove should admonish with disapprobation. To rebuke is always to reprove highly or sharply. To reprimand is to reprove formally; this is the work of 1 having authority. To censure should express an unfavorable viewpoint; it is less personal as compared to previous terms. Remonstrate with and expostulate with tend to be more argumentative and imply a lot more of guidance than either reprove or censure; in addition they apply simply to acts today occurring or just around to take place, while censure applies simply to something past. To reproach one is to put fault upon him in direct address, in accordance with feeling, to try to shame him in what he has done. The language advance when you look at the degree of probability the person reproved, etc., doesn't admit the fault that he could be taken fully to task. Understand distinction of corresponding nouns under admonition.
    • To pass a viewpoint, specifically a severe opinion; judge: followed closely by of or on.

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