broach definition

  • verb-transitive:
    • to carry up (an interest) for discussion or discussion.
    • To announce: We broached our programs for the new year.
    • To pierce so that you can draw off liquid: broach a keg of alcohol.
    • To draw off (a liquid) by piercing a hole in a cask or any other container.
    • To shape or enlarge (a hole) with a tapered, serrated tool.
    • Nautical To veer or trigger to veer broadside to the wind and waves: attempted to keep carefully the vessel from broaching to.
    • To spit; to pierce just like a spit.
    • To touch; to pierce, as a cask, so that you can draw the alcohol. Therefore: To let on; to drop, as blood.
    • to start the very first time, since shops.
    • to help make public; to complete; to create first; to place forth; to present as a subject of conversation.
    • To cause to begin with or break out.
    • To profile around, as a block of rock, by chiseling with a coarse device.
    • To expand or dress (a hole), through a broach.
    • to create up (a topic) for conversation or debate.
    • To announce: We broached our programs for the new-year.
    • To pierce in order to draw down liquid: broach a keg of alcohol.
    • to attract down (a liquid) by piercing a hole in a cask or any other container.
    • To shape or enlarge (a hole) with a tapered, serrated tool.
    • Nautical To veer or cause to veer broadside on wind and waves: attempted to keep the watercraft from broaching to.
    • To spit; to pierce as with a spit.
    • To touch; to pierce, as a cask, in order to draw the alcohol. For this reason: to allow away; to shed, as bloodstream.
    • to open up for the first time, as shops.
    • To make general public; to total; to write very first; to place forth; to present as an interest of discussion.
    • resulting in to begin with or bust out.
    • To shape about, as a block of rock, by chiseling with a coarse device.
    • To enlarge or dress (a hole), using a broach.
  • noun:
    • A tapered, serrated tool familiar with shape or expand a hole.
    • the opening produced by such something.
    • A spit for roasting meat.
    • A mason's thin chisel.
    • A gimlet for tapping or broaching casks.
    • Variant of brooch.
    • some chisel points installed on one-piece of steel.
    • alternate spelling of brooch.
    • A spit.
    • An awl; a bodkin; in addition, a wooden pole or pin, sharpened at each and every end, used by thatchers.
    • something of metallic, generally tapering, and of a polygonal kind, with from four to eight cutting sides, for smoothing or enlarging holes in metal; sometimes made smooth or without sides, as for burnishing pivot holes in watches; a reamer. The broach for weapon barrels is commonly square and without taper.
    • A straight tool with file teeth, manufactured from steel, becoming pressed through irregular holes in material that can't be dressed by revolving resources; a drift.
    • an extensive chisel for stonecutting.
    • A spire rising from a tower.
    • A clasp for attaching a garment. See Brooch.
    • A spitlike start, on head of a new stag.
    • The stick that candle wicks tend to be suspended for dipping.
    • The pin in a lock which gets in the barrel of this secret.
    • A spit.
    • A spear.
    • An awl; a bodkin.
    • A spike; a skewer; a-sharp stick; specifically, a rod of sallow, hazel, or any other tough and pliant wood, sharpened at each end and bent in the centre, employed by thatchers to pierce and fix their particular work.
    • A spur.
    • A fish-hook.
    • A spike or standard for a candle.
    • A taper; a torch.
    • A spindle; a spool.
    • In architecture, previously, a spire of any kind; today, specifically, as found in some areas of England by some article writers on design, a spire which rises right from walls of their tower, without parapets and gutters.
    • A narrow - pointed chisel utilized by masons for hewing rocks.
    • Any tapered boring-bit or exercise.
    • A straight steel tool with file-teeth for pressing through irregular holes in steel that cannot be clothed by revolving tools.
    • That area of the stem of an integral which projects beyond the little bit or internet, and enters a socket within the interior associated with lock.
    • That pin in a lock which comes into the barrel for the key.
    • The stick from where candle-wicks tend to be suspended for dipping.
    • A gimlet utilized in opening casks for sampling their articles.
    • A fitting for an Argand gas-burner.
    • A start, like the end of a spit, on mind of a stag.
    • A pin or clasp to fasten a garment; specifically, an ornamental pin, clasp, or buckle, and particularly a breast-pin, of gold, gold, or other steel, attached to the dress or based from the throat: within good sense today often spelled brooch (which see).
    • a periodic title when it comes to hurdy-gurdy (which see).
    • In quarrying, an instrument used in a machine-drill to break down the walls between a row of boreholes to be able to develop a continuous channel. Also known as broaching-bit.
    • A short-stapled cotton fiber cultivated inside Broach region associated with the Bombay Presidency, British India.
    • a decorative pin donned by ladies
    • A tapered, serrated tool regularly shape or enlarge a hole.
    • The hole produced by such a tool.
    • A spit for roasting animal meat.
    • A mason's thin chisel.
    • A gimlet for tapping or broaching casks.
    • Variant of brooch.
    • a number of chisel things installed on one-piece of metal.
    • Alternative spelling of brooch.
    • A spit.
    • An awl; a bodkin; additionally, a wooden rod or pin, sharpened at each and every end, used by thatchers.
    • something of steel, generally speaking tapering, and of a polygonal type, with from four to eight cutting sides, for smoothing or enlarging holes in metal; occasionally made smooth or without edges, in terms of burnishing pivot holes in watches; a reamer. The broach for weapon drums is commonly square and without taper.
    • A straight device with file teeth, manufactured from steel, become pressed through unusual holes in material that can't be dressed by revolving resources; a drift.
    • an extensive chisel for stonecutting.
    • A spire rising from a tower.
    • A clasp for fastening a garment. See Brooch.
    • A spitlike begin, in the mind of a stag.
    • The stick from which candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
    • The pin in a lock which enters the barrel of secret.
    • A spit.
    • A spear.
    • An awl; a bodkin.
    • a surge; a skewer; a-sharp stick; specifically, a rod of sallow, hazel, or any other difficult and pliant timber, sharpened at each and every end and bent in the middle, used by thatchers to pierce and fix their work.
    • A spur.
    • A fish-hook.
    • A spike or standard for a candle.
    • A taper; a torch.
    • A spindle; a spool.
    • In architecture, previously, a spire of any kind; today, especially, as used in some parts of England by some authors on structure, a spire which rises straight from the walls of the tower, without parapets and gutters.
    • A narrow - pointed chisel used by masons for hewing rocks.
    • Any tapered boring-bit or exercise.
    • A straight metallic device with file-teeth for pressing through unusual holes in steel that can't be dressed by revolving resources.
    • That an element of the stem of a key which projects beyond the bit or web, and enters a socket when you look at the interior of the lock.
    • That pin in a lock which comes into the barrel associated with the key.
    • The stick where candle-wicks are suspended for dipping.
    • A gimlet found in starting casks for sampling their particular contents.
    • A fitting for an Argand gas-burner.
    • a-start, just like the end of a spit, regarding mind of a young stag.
    • A pin or clasp to fasten a garment; especially, an ornamental pin, clasp, or buckle, and especially a breast-pin, of silver, gold, or any other metal, attached to the gown or depending from the neck: within good sense today generally spelled brooch (which see).
    • an intermittent title for hurdy-gurdy (which see).
    • In quarrying, an instrument found in a machine-drill to split down the wall space between a-row of boreholes to develop a continuous station. Also referred to as broaching-bit.
    • A short-stapled cotton fiber grown when you look at the Broach region associated with the Bombay Presidency, British India.
    • a decorative pin donned by ladies
  • verb:
    • In order to make a hole in, especially a cask of alcohol, and place in a tap being draw the fluid.
    • To open, to produce an opening into; to pierce.
    • (figuratively) to begin with conversation about (anything).
    • become switched sideways to oncoming waves, specifically large or breaking waves.
    • To cause to show sideways to oncoming waves, specially big or breaking waves.
    • becoming overcome or submerged by a wave or rise of water.
    • talk about a topic for conversation
    • In order to make a hole in, specially a cask of alcohol, and put in a tap so that you can draw the fluid.
    • to start, in order to make an opening into; to pierce.
    • (figuratively) To begin conversation about (something).
    • To be switched laterally to oncoming waves, particularly big or breaking waves.
    • To cause to turn sideways to oncoming waves, specifically huge or breaking waves.
    • becoming overcome or submerged by a wave or rise of water.
    • talk about an interest for conversation
  • others:
    • To spit; pierce much like a spit.
    • To spur.
    • In masonry, to rough-hew.
    • to open up the very first time for the intended purpose of taking out fully one thing; even more specially, to tap or pierce, as a cask in order to draw the liquor: as, to broach a hogshead.
    • ergo, figuratively to open up, whilst the lips for utterance.
    • to allow down; shed.
    • To state or give expression to the very first time; complete; give fully out; specially, begin discussion or discussion about; introduce through topic: as, to broach a theory or an opinion.
    • To give a-start to; set going.
    • To spit; pierce as with a spit.
    • To spur.
    • In masonry, to rough-hew.
    • to open up the very first time for the true purpose of taking out fully one thing; more especially, to touch or pierce, as a cask to be able to draw the liquor: as, to broach a hogshead.
    • ergo, figuratively to open up, whilst the mouth for utterance.
    • to allow on; shed.
    • To state or give expression to for the first time; complete; give out; especially, start conversation or conversation about; present by means of subject: as, to broach a theory or a viewpoint.
    • to provide a start to; set going.

Related Sources

  • Definition for "broach"
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  • Urban Dictionary for "broach"
    • Unpleasant mix between buddy and cockroach.
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