barrow definition

  • noun:
    • A handbarrow.
    • A wheelbarrow.
    • A large mound of planet or rocks put over a burial site.
    • A pig that's been castrated before reaching intimate maturity.
    • A mountain.
    • A hill.
    • A mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves.
    • A heap of rubbish, attle, or other such refuse.
    • a little car accustomed carry lots and pulled or pressed yourself.
    • A castrated boar.
    • A support having manages, sufficient reason for or without a wheel, where heavy or cumbersome things can be transported manually. See handbarrow, and wheelbarrow.
    • A wicker situation, which salt is placed to strain.
    • A hog, esp. a male hog castrated.
    • A large mound of earth or rocks across keeps of this dead; a tumulus.
    • A heap of rubbish, attle, etc.
    • A hill or hill: initially placed on mountains or mountains of every level, perhaps the greatest, but later on restricted to reduce elevations. In this good sense the word survives only in provincial usage or as part of local brands in England.
    • A mound; a heap. Particularly A mound of earth or rocks raised over a grave; a sepulchral mound; a tumulus.
    • A burrow or warren. See burrow, berry.
    • A frame utilized by a couple of men in holding a lot; previously, these framework, as a stretcher or bier; specifically, a-flat rectangular framework of taverns or panels, with projecting shafts or manages (in The united kingdomt called trams) at both finishes, wherein its held: often known as a hand-barrow.
    • A similar frame, typically used in the form of a shallow field with either flaring or upright edges, and supported in the front formerly by two tires, now by one small wheel inserted between your front shafts, and pressed by one man, which aids the end opposite to your wheel by way of the trunk shafts: usually known as a wheelbarrow.
    • A-frame or package of bigger dimensions, resting on an axle between two big tires, and pressed or pulled by way of shafts at one end; a hand-cart: because, a costermonger's barrow.
    • A barrowful; force transported in or on a barrow.
    • In salt-works, a wicker instance where salt is put to empty.
    • The egg-case of a skate or a ray: so called from the similarity to a hand-barrow.
    • A castrated boar. Also called barrow-pig or barrow-hog.
    • A wood or grove: a word surviving only in English local brands, as Barrow-in-Furness, Barrowfield.
    • Same as barrow-coat.
    • a cart for carrying little loads; has actually handles and another or higher tires
    • the quantity that a barrow will hold
    • (archeology) a heap of earth placed over primitive tombs
    • A handbarrow.
    • A wheelbarrow.
    • a big mound of planet or stones placed over a burial website.
    • A pig which has been castrated before achieving sexual readiness.
    • A mountain.
    • A hill.
    • A mound of earth and rocks raised over a grave or graves.
    • A heap of rubbish, attle, or other these types of refuse.
    • a little vehicle used to carry lots and pulled or forced by hand.
    • A castrated boar.
    • A support having handles, sufficient reason for or without a wheel, upon which heavy or large things may be transported manually. See handbarrow, and wheelbarrow.
    • A wicker instance, by which salt is placed to drain.
    • A hog, esp. a male hog castrated.
    • a sizable mound of earth or rocks within the keeps associated with dead; a tumulus.
    • A heap of rubbish, attle, etc.
    • A hill or mountain: initially placed on hills or mountains of any height, even the best, but later on limited to reduce elevations. In this good sense the term survives just in provincial use or as an element of local names in England.
    • A mound; a heap. In particular A mound of planet or rocks raised over a grave; a sepulchral mound; a tumulus.
    • A burrow or warren. See burrow, berry.
    • A-frame used by two or more guys in carrying a load; formerly, such framework, as a stretcher or bier; specifically, a flat rectangular framework of taverns or panels, with projecting shafts or handles (in England labeled as trams) at both stops, in which it's held: usually known as a hand-barrow.
    • the same framework, typically used in the form of a shallow package with either flaring or upright edges, and supported in-front previously by two wheels, now by a single tiny wheel placed involving the front shafts, and pushed by one man, just who aids the end opposite to your wheel by means of the rear shafts: usually called a wheelbarrow.
    • A frame or package of bigger dimensions, resting on an axle between two big rims, and pressed or pulled in the form of shafts at one end; a hand-cart: since, a costermonger's barrow.
    • A barrowful; force transported in or on a barrow.
    • In salt-works, a wicker case in which the sodium is placed to empty.
    • The egg-case of a skate or a ray: so called from its similarity to a hand-barrow.
    • A castrated boar. Also referred to as barrow-pig or barrow-hog.
    • A wood or grove: a word enduring only in English neighborhood names, as Barrow-in-Furness, Barrowfield.
    • Same as barrow-coat.
    • a cart to carry little lots; has actually manages plus one or more tires
    • the number that a barrow will hold
    • (archeology) a heap of planet placed over prehistoric tombs
  • others:
    • To wheel or convey in a barrow: because, to barrow coal in a pit.
    • To wheel or convey in a barrow: because, to barrow coal in a pit.

Related Sources

  • Definition for "barrow"
  • Sentence for "barrow"
  • Phrases for "barrow"
  • Same Context for "barrow"
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