• Definition for "ate"
  • Sentence for "ate"
  • Quotes for "ate"
  • Urban Dictionary for "ate"
    • Past tense associated with term consume…
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ate definition

  • verb:
    • last tight of consume.
    • Simple past of eat.
    • Past tense of eat.
    • Easy last of consume.
  • others:
    • the preterit of consume.
    • .
    • In petrography, a suffix added to the brands of grads into the quantitative category of igneous stones. See rock.
    • the preterit of eat.
    • .
    • In petrography, a suffix added to the brands of grads when you look at the quantitative classification of igneous stones. See stone.
  • noun:
    • The goddess of mischievous folly; also, in later poets, the goddess of vengeance.
    • Preterit of eat.
    • In Greek misconception, an ever-present evil genius leading men to criminal activity; the goddess of blundering mischief: a personification of this careless blindness and moral distortion inflicted by the gods in retribution for presumption and wickedness, typifying the self-perpetuating nature of bad.
    • A suffix of Latin source: In adjectives, in which -ate is the same as and cognate with English -ed, -d, -t, in perfect participles and participial adjectives, the indigenous English suffix being often included with -ate when a verb in -ate exists, as in desolate or desolat-ed, accumulate or accumulat-ed, situate or situat-ed, etc.
    • In nouns, of individuals, as legate, delegate, reprobate, etc., or of things, as mandate, precipitate, etc.; specially, in chem., in nouns denoting a salt formed because of the activity of an acid on a base, like in acetate, nitrate, sulphate, etc., the suffix becoming included with the stem (usually reduced) associated with the name of this acid.
    • A suffix of Latin origin, a standard formative in verbs taken from the Latin, as with gather, imitate, militate, etc., or formed in English, either on Latin stems, like in felicitate, capacitate, etc., or on stems of various other origin. See etymology.
    • A suffix of Latin origin, denoting company, an office, a body of officials, like in consulate, pontificate, decemvirate, senate (Latin senātus, from senex, a classic man), episcopate, etc., and sometimes one officer, as magistrate (Latin magistrātus, precisely magistracy, also a magistrate), the suffix within the last few usage being equivalent to -ate in legate, etc., and to -ate in primate, etc.
    • A suffix of Latin beginning, practically equal to -ate in nouns, and -ate (in magistrate), such as magnate, primate, and (in Latin plural) penates, optimates.
    • A suffix of Greek beginning, occurring unfelt in pirate (which see).
    • goddess of unlawful rashness and its particular discipline
    • The goddess of mischievous folly; in addition, in later poets, the goddess of vengeance.
    • Preterit of consume.
    • In Greek myth, an ever-present evil genius leading males on to crime; the goddess of blundering mischief: a personification regarding the careless loss of sight and ethical distortion inflicted by the gods in retribution for presumption and wickedness, typifying the self-perpetuating nature of bad.
    • A suffix of Latin origin: In adjectives, where -ate is the same as and cognate with English -ed, -d, -t, in perfect participles and participial adjectives, the indigenous English suffix being frequently added to -ate whenever a verb in -ate exists, as in desolate or desolat-ed, accumulate or accumulat-ed, situate or situat-ed, etc.
    • In nouns, of individuals, as legate, delegate, reprobate, etc., or of things, as mandate, precipitate, etc.; specially, in chem., in nouns denoting a salt created by the action of an acid on a base, as in acetate, nitrate, sulphate, etc., the suffix being put into the stem (often shortened) regarding the title of acid.
    • A suffix of Latin beginning, a typical formative in verbs obtained from the Latin, such as accumulate, imitate, militate, etc., or created in English, either on Latin stems, as with felicitate, capacitate, etc., or on stems of other beginning. See etymology.
    • A suffix of Latin beginning, denoting company, an office, a body of officers, such as consulate, pontificate, decemvirate, senate (Latin senātus, from senex, a vintage guy), episcopate, etc., and quite often a single officer, as magistrate (Latin magistrātus, precisely magistracy, in addition a magistrate), the suffix within the last use becoming equal to -ate in legate, etc., also to -ate in primate, etc.
    • A suffix of Latin origin, almost equal to -ate in nouns, and -ate (in magistrate), as with magnate, primate, and (in Latin plural) penates, optimates.
    • A suffix of Greek source, happening unfelt in pirate (which see).
    • goddess of criminal rashness as well as its punishment
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