and definition

  • conjunction:
    • along with or along side; along with; as well as. Regularly connect terms, phrases, or clauses that have the exact same grammatical purpose in a construction.
    • Added to; plus: Two and two makes four.
    • regularly show result: provide the boy an opportunity, in which he might amaze you.
    • Informal To. Utilized between finite verbs, eg go, come, take to, compose, or see: attempt to find it; come and determine. See Usage Note at try.
    • Archaic If: also it pleases you.
    • As a coordinating combination; expressing two elements you need to take collectively or perhaps in inclusion to each other.
    • Expressing an ailment.
    • A particle which expresses the connection of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.
    • In order to; -- made use of instead of the infinitival to, specially after take to, come, go.
    • it's occasionally, in old songs, only expletive.
    • If; however. See An, conj.
    • Together with or along side; as well as; including. Used to link words, expressions, or conditions that have the same grammatical purpose in a construction.
    • Added to; plus: Two as well as 2 creates four.
    • regularly suggest outcome: supply the son an opportunity, and then he might shock you.
    • Informal To. Utilized between finite verbs, such go, come, attempt, compose, or see: attempt to believe it is; come and find out. See Usage Note at try.
    • Archaic If: and it pleases you.
    • As a coordinating combination; revealing two elements to be taken collectively or in addition together.
    • revealing a condition.
    • A particle which conveys the connection of connection or addition. It is always conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.
    • to be able to; -- utilized instead of the infinitival to, specifically after decide to try, come, get.
    • it really is sometimes, in old tracks, a mere expletive.
    • If; though. See An, conj.
  • idiom:
    • forth along with other unspecified things of the identical class: bought groceries, went along to the financial institution, found the dried out cleansing, etc.
    • forth more in much the same.
    • and some casual With somewhat more in addition: This task will take our ability and then some.
    • forth as well as other unspecified things of the same class: purchased groceries, decided to go to the bank, found the dry cleansing, and so forth.
    • forth more in much the same.
    • after which some Informal With significantly more additionally: This project will take all our skill then some.
  • noun:
    • Breathing.
    • Sea-mist; water-smoke.
    • Breath.
    • Sea-mist; water-smoke.
  • verb:
    • To inhale; whisper; devise; imagine.
    • To inhale; whisper; devise; imagine.
  • others:
    • A. Coördinate use.
    • Connective: A word connecting a word, phrase, term, or sentence with this which precedes it: a colorless particle without a precise synonym in English, but expressed roughly by ‘with, along side, as well as, besides, also, more over,’ sun and rain linked becoming grammatically coördinate.
    • whenever numerous terms, phrases, clauses, or phrases are connected, the connective is currently generally omitted before all except the very last, unless retained for rhetorical effect. The connected elements are sometimes identical, expressing continuous repetition, either certainly, as, to walk two as well as 2; or indefinitely, since, for ever and ever before, to attend many.
    • The repetition frequently suggests an improvement of quality beneath the same title; since, there are deacons and deacons (that's, according to the proverb, “There's odds in deacons”); there are novels and books (that is, all kinds of novels). To make the link distinctly inclusive, the expression both precedes the very first member: since, in both England plus France. For this, by a Latinism, and … and has now been often used in poetry (Latin and French et … el).
    • Introductive: in extension of a previous phrase indicated, implied, or understood.
    • In this use, especially in continuation for the statement suggested by assent to a previous concern. The extension may mark surprise, incredulity, indignation, etc.: as, And shall we see him once again? And you dare hence deal with me personally?
    • Adverbial: Also; also.
    • thus, but and, also: common in the old ballads.
    • B. Conditional usage.
    • If; supposing that: because, therefore be sure to
    • drawback ys, that today childern of gramer-scole conneth forget about Frensch than can right here carry [their left] heele, & that's harm for ham [them] & a [if they] scholle passe the se, & trauayle in odd londes.
    • usually with additional if (whence mod. dial. an if, nif, if). For this reason, but while, however if.
    • A prefix in center English and Anglo-Saxon, represented in contemporary English by an- in solution, a- in along, and (mixed with initial on-) by on- in onset, etc.
    • A. Coördinate usage.
    • Connective: A word connecting a word, phrase, clause, or sentence with that which precedes it: a colorless particle without an exact synonym in English, but expressed approximately by ‘with, along with, together with, besides, also, moreover,’ the elements connected being grammatically coördinate.
    • When numerous words, expressions, clauses, or sentences tend to be linked, the connective happens to be generally omitted before all except the last, unless retained for rhetorical effect. The connected elements are now and again identical, articulating continuous repetition, either definitely, as, to go two as well as 2; or indefinitely, because, for good and previously, to hold back many years.
    • The repetition frequently implies a positive change of high quality beneath the exact same name; because, you can find deacons and deacons (this is certainly, based on the proverb, “There's chances in deacons”); you will find novels and novels (which, a number of novels). To really make the connection distinctly inclusive, the word both precedes 1st member: as, in both The united kingdomt as well as in France. Because of this, by a Latinism, and … and has been sometimes found in poetry (Latin and French et … el).
    • Introductive: in continuation of a previous phrase indicated, suggested, or comprehended.
    • inside use, particularly in extension regarding the declaration implied by assent to a previous question. The continuation may mark shock, incredulity, indignation, etc.: as, And shall we see him once again? Therefore dare hence address me?
    • Adverbial: Also; also.
    • therefore, but and, and also: typical in old ballads.
    • B. Conditional use.
    • If; supposing that: since, and you be sure to
    • downside ys, that now childern of gramer-scole conneth no longer Frensch than can right here raise [their left] heele, & that is harm for ham [them] & a [if they] scholle passe the se, & trauayle in odd londes.
    • usually with additional if (whence mod. dial. an if, nif, if). Thus, but and when, but if.
    • A prefix in center English and Anglo-Saxon, represented in modern-day English by an- in answer, a- in along, and (blended with original on-) by on- in onset, etc.

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