all definition

  • adjective:
    • Being or representing the whole or final number, amount, or volume: most of the house windows tend to be available. Package all cards. See Synonyms at whole.
    • Constituting, becoming, or representing the sum total degree or perhaps the entire: all Christendom.
    • Being the utmost feasible of: argued the way it is in all seriousness.
    • Every: experienced all method of difficulty.
    • Any whatsoever: beyond all question.
    • Pennsylvania Finished; utilized: The oranges are. See local Note at gum musical organization.
    • casual becoming several: Who all found the celebration? See Local Note at you-all.
    • The whole amount, degree, timeframe, amount, quality, or amount of; the whole; the whole amount of; any whatever; every
    • Any.
    • Only; alone; nothing but.
    • completely given to or soaked up by
    • quantifier; combined with either mass or matter nouns to indicate the whole quantity or number of or all of a class
  • noun:
    • the entire of your respective lot of money, resources, or energy; every little thing you've got: The brave defenders provided their particular all.
    • every little thing feasible.
    • The totality of the belongings.
    • the entire quantity, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; every thing included or concerned; the aggregate; the entire; totality; every thing or every person.
    • A whole; an entirety; a totality of things or qualities. The All is employed for the universe.
    • an individual's entire interest, concern, or home: often with a possessive pronoun: as, she's got given the woman all.
  • pronoun:
    • The entire or total number, amount, or amount; totality: many of us are sick. All of that i've is yours.
    • everyone else; every thing: justice for all.
  • adverb:
    • Wholly; totally: a space coated all white; guidelines that have been all wrong.
    • Each; apiece: a score of five all.
    • So much: i will be all of the better for the experience.
    • intensifier.
    • Apiece; each.
    • such.
    • Wholly; totally; entirely; completely; very; extremely
    • also; just. (frequently only intensive adjunct.)
    • to a whole degree or even the total or whole extent (`whole' is frequently made use of informally for `wholly')
  • idiom:
    • all along From the beginning; throughout: saw through disguise all along.
    • all but almost; nearly: all but crying with relief.
    • all-in Tired; fatigued.
    • overall Everything becoming taken into account: overall, the criticism felt reasonable.
    • all Informal only: a conversation that took most of 5 minutes.
    • all one Of no distinction; immaterial: Whether we go out or remain in, it is all someone to me.
    • all-out With all a person's strength, capability, or sources.
    • all that Informal towards the level expected.
    • all there psychologically unimpaired or competent.
    • all the same Notwithstanding; nevertheless.
    • the same Of no difference, immaterial.
    • all informed With everything considered; in most: All told, we won 100 games.
    • and all sorts of Along With Other things of the identical kind: "The only thing they appeared to have commonly had been their cowboy equipment, ten-gallon caps and all sorts of” ( Edward Chen).
    • at all In any way: struggling to go anyway.
    • at all to virtually any degree; whatever: not at all sorry.
    • be all casual To say or utter. Pre-owned chiefly in verbal narration: He's all, "just what did you do that for?”
    • in all Considering everything; all together: In all, it rained for two hours. I bought four hats, in all.
  • determiner:
    • Every individual or anything of given course, with no exceptions (the noun or noun term denoting the course should be plural or uncountable).
    • for the whole of (a stated duration; typically used in combination with products of each and every day or longer).
    • everyone else.
    • every little thing.
  • conjunction:
    • although
    • Although; albeit.
  • others:
    • The whole amount of, with reference to substance, extent, duration, amount, or degree: with a noun when you look at the single, chiefly such nouns (proper brands, names of substances, abstract nouns—any entire or any part regarded alone overall) as from their particular definition or specific use don't this kind of usage admit of a plural: since, all Europe; all Homer; all skin; all control; all history.
    • the entire quantity of, with reference to individuals or particulars, taken collectively: with a noun in plural: as, all males; all nations; all metals; all hopes; all sciences; all times.
    • Every: mainly with type, sort, fashion, and previously with thing.
    • Any; any whatever: after a preposition or verb implying negation or exclusion: since, beyond all debate; away from all concern; he was without all thought of danger.
    • Only; alone.
    • whenever accompanied to nouns combined with a definitive (the definite article, a possessive or demonstrative pronoun, etc.), all precedes the latter whether with one or plural noun, otherwise employs the noun if it's plural; because, all my work; all their products; all this time; all these things; all men agreed to this, or, the men all decided to this. Inside expressions all day long, through the night, all summer time, all cold temperatures, most of the 12 months, constantly, etc., the noun is an adverbial accusative. In the 1st four the article is normally omitted.
    • When accompanied to your own or relative pronoun in the plural, all may precede, the good news is frequently employs, the pronoun.
    • the choice building is perhaps all folks, them all, etc. (see II., 2); or even the two constructions may stand together.
    • The adjective all, with a singular or plural noun, is actually divided from the topic, specially because of the verb be (expressed, or in the current participle usually omitted), and, becoming thus apparently part of the predicate, assumes a transitional position, and could equally very well be thought to be an adverb, meaning altogether, wholly: as, your house ended up being all dark; he was all ears; the indegent horse was all skin and bones; the papers had been all-in confusion; it had been all a blunder; it's all gone.
    • The whole amount or amount; the entire; the aggregate; the full total: in a singular sense.
    • the entire number; every individual or specific, taken collectively; particularly, all men or everybody: in a plural sense.
    • All, in a choice of of the preceding utilizes, can be followed closely by a limiting phrase with of.
    • every thing: as, usually all? which all.
    • entirely; completely.
    • In every means; entirely; wholly.
    • in just about any degree; in every level whatever; at all degree; for any explanation; on any consideration: because, I happened to be astonished at his coming anyway.
    • by any means; to virtually any level; of any kind or character: in negative, interrogative, or conditional clauses (compare I., 4): since, he had been generally not very disrupted; did you hear some thing? if you notice anything, let me know; no offense after all.
    • Notwithstanding; in spite of (the thing or fact mentioned): followed by an object noun or pronoun or an object term with that, that will be often omitted: as, for several that, the simple fact continues to be the exact same; you might do so for many (that) we care, or even for all me. See for.
    • entirely: since, partly or in all.
    • etc., in some games, means that all (or just both) the people or sides have actually two, three, etc., things.
    • Wholly; completely; totally; entirely; very. Inside use normal with adverbs of level, specifically too: as, he appeared every far too late.
    • [from frequent center English utilization of all in this feeling before verbs with the prefix to- (see to-, to-break, to-cut, to-tear, etc.), that prefix, whenever not any longer felt therefore, came to be attached to the adverb, all to or alto becoming considered an adverbial expression or word, and sometimes improperly used, in later English, with verbs having initially no claim toward prefix.
    • also; only: initially emphatic or intensive.
    • With conjunctions if and even though, in conditional and concessive clauses: If all, though all, or reversely, all if, all though, even when, although. These forms are obsolete, except the past, which is today written as one word, although (which see).
    • [if the verb this kind of clauses, according to a common subjunctive construction, had been placed ahead of the topic, the conjunction if or though might-be omitted, leaving all as an apparent combination, when you look at the feeling of even in the event, although; particularly in the formula al be, as al be it, al be it that, al be that (today albe, albeit, which see).
    • With combination as: All as. Just when; whenever; as.
    • like.
    • just; solely.
    • From end to end; in bookbinding, (sewed) such a way that bond passes from end to end of each and every section, At full-length.
    • also near to the wind: said of a vessel therefore brought up to the wind that sails shake.
    • completely; entirely; rather.
    • utilized particularly with beverage (see carouse).
    • Thoroughly; totally: as, “Dombey and Son” is Dickens around.
    • Indisposed; typically ill; having an all-overish sensation.
    • All past; entirely ceased: because, that is all-around.
    • to all the that extent; such: since, all much better; all the fitter; all of the sooner. See the.
    • [All, in composition, often types a real ingredient, as in almighty, already, constantly, algates, but often stands, with or often without a hyphen, in free combo, keeping a syntactic relation, either as adjective, like in All-hallows, All-saints, allspice; as noun, in a choice of genitive plural, like in all-father, or perhaps in accusative as direct item, as in all-giver, all-seer, all-heal, specifically with present participles having all as object (though originally oftentimes all ended up being adverbial), as in all-healing, all-seeing, all-pervading, etc.; or as adverb, either with a noun (in transitional construction pointed out under all, a., I., at end), as in all-bone, all-mouth, all-rail, all-wool, or with nearly every adjective that admits of rhetorical brush, like in all-perfect, all-powerful, all-wise, all-glorious, necessary.]

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