• Definition for "alarm"
    • an abrupt anxiety brought on by the realization…
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  • Sentence for "alarm"
    • Surely adding to their alarm is…
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  • Quotes for "alarm"
    • "Morning comes whether you set the…"
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  • Etymologically Related for "alarm"
  • Same Context for "alarm"

alarm definition

  • noun:
    • an abrupt anxiety brought on by the realization of danger.
    • A warning of present or nearing risk.
    • An electrical, digital, or mechanical product that acts to warn of danger in the form of a sound or signal.
    • The sounding process of an alarm clock.
    • A call to hands.
    • A summons to arms, as regarding the method of an enemy.
    • Any sound or information designed to provide notice of approaching danger; a warning noise to arouse interest; a warning of risk.
    • Sudden surprise with worry or horror excited by apprehension of risk; inside army usage, generally, unexpected apprehension of being attacked by surprise.
    • A mechanical product for awaking individuals, or rousing their particular interest.
    • An instance of an alarum ringing or clanging, to provide a noise sign at a certain time.
    • A summons to hands, as on the strategy of an enemy.
    • Any noise or information intended to offer notice of approaching danger; a warning noise to arouse attention; a warning of risk.
    • a-sudden attack; disruption; broil.
    • Sudden shock with worry or horror excited by apprehension of risk; inside army usage, commonly, sudden apprehension to be attacked by shock.
    • A mechanical contrivance for awaking persons from rest, or rousing their particular interest; an alarum.
    • A summons to arms, as regarding the strategy of an enemy; ergo, any noise, outcry, or information designed to offer notice of nearing risk.
    • A hostile assault; a tumult; a broil; a disturbance.
    • a rapid worry or painful suspense excited by an apprehension of risk; apprehension; fright: since, you'll find nothing in the infection to cause security.
    • A warning noise; an indication for attention; an urgent call, summons, or notification.
    • A self-acting contrivance of any sort accustomed call interest, rouse from sleep, warn of danger, etc.
    • Alarm, Apprehension, Fright, Terror, Dismay, Consternation, Panic, affright, agitation, flutter, perturbation. These words all present levels of fear in view of possible or particular, possibly imminent, danger.
    • Apprehension is the most affordable level of anxiety; your brain takes your hands on the idea of risk, and without alarm views the very best way of satisfying it.
    • Alarm may be the after that phase; by derivation it will be the alarum or summons to arms. The feelings are agitated because of sudden or just-discovered risk to at least one's self or other individuals. Typically its effect upon your brain is a lot like that apprehension; it energizes rather than overpowers the psychological faculties.
    • Fright, horror, and dismay are greater and maybe equal degrees of concern; their difference is within kind as well as in impact.
    • Fright affects especially the nerves and sensory faculties, being generally the effect of abrupt fear.
    • Terror may be a later form of fright, or separate so when unexpected; it overpowers the understanding and unmans one.
    • A sudden worry due to the realization of danger.
    • Dismay appals or reduces the courage and hope, and for that reason, as suggested by its derivation, the disposition to complete almost anything to ward off the peril; exactly what dismays one may end up being the failure or loss of his opted for ways defense.
    • A warning of current or approaching danger.
    • Fright and terror in many cases are the result of undefined worries, as in superstition, and therefore are specifically used with mention of actual concern.
    • a power, digital, or mechanical device that serves to alert of risk by way of an audio or signal.
    • Consternation overwhelms the mental traits because of the suddenness or the entirely unforeseen success of the risk.
    • The sounding procedure of an alarm time clock.
    • Panic is a peculiar as a type of worry; it really is sudden, demoralizing, a short-term insanity of worry, completely from proportion to its cause; there might even be no cause discoverable. It's the fear of quite a few folks, or, figuratively, of pets.
    • A call to arms.
    • A summons to arms, as in the approach of an enemy.
    • Any noise or information intended to offer notice of approaching danger; a warning noise to arouse attention; a warning of risk.
    • Sudden surprise with worry or terror excited by apprehension of danger; in military usage, generally, abrupt apprehension of being assaulted by surprise.
    • A mechanical unit for awaking individuals, or rousing their interest.
    • a tool that signals the event of some unwelcome occasion
    • an example of an alarum ringing or clanging, to provide a noise sign at a specific time.
    • concern resulting from the awareness of danger
    • a computerized signal (usually a sound) caution of risk
    • a clock that wakes a sleeper at some predetermined time
    • A summons to arms, as regarding strategy of an enemy.
    • Any noise or information intended to offer notice of nearing danger; a warning sound to arouse interest; a warning of risk.
    • A sudden attack; disruption; broil.
    • Sudden surprise with fear or horror excited by apprehension of danger; when you look at the army usage, frequently, sudden apprehension to be assaulted by surprise.
    • A mechanical contrivance for awaking people from sleep, or rousing their particular interest; an alarum.
    • A summons to hands, as from the strategy of an enemy; ergo, any noise, outcry, or information designed to give notice of nearing danger.
    • A hostile assault; a tumult; a broil; a disturbance.
    • a-sudden fear or painful suspense excited by an apprehension of danger; apprehension; fright: because, nothing is in his disease to cause alarm.
    • A warning sound; a signal for interest; an urgent call, summons, or notice.
    • A self-acting contrivance of any kind always call attention, rouse from sleep, warn of risk, etc.
    • Alarm, Apprehension, Fright, Terror, Dismay, Consternation, Panic, affright, agitation, flutter, perturbation. These words all present quantities of fear in view of feasible or certain, possibly imminent, risk.
    • Apprehension may be the lowest amount of concern; the mind takes your hands on the concept of risk, and without security considers the simplest way of satisfying it.
    • Alarm may be the next stage; by derivation it's the alarum or summons to arms. The emotions tend to be agitated in view of sudden or just-discovered danger to a single's self or other people. Generally its effect upon your head is similar to compared to apprehension; it energizes without overpowers the mental traits.
    • Fright, horror, and dismay tend to be higher and maybe equal quantities of fear; their distinction is in sort as well as in impact.
    • Fright affects especially the nerves and sensory faculties, being usually the aftereffect of sudden fear.
    • Terror may be a later kind of fright, or separate and as abrupt; it overpowers the comprehension and unmans one.
    • Dismay appals or breaks down the courage and hope, therefore, as recommended by its derivation, the disposition to complete anything to defend against the danger; just what dismays you can function as the failure or loss of his plumped for method of protection.
    • Fright and terror tend to be the effect of undefined worries, such as superstition, and generally are especially used in combination with mention of the actual fear.
    • Consternation overwhelms the emotional characteristics by the suddenness or perhaps the utterly unforeseen greatness associated with the danger.
    • anxiety is a peculiar type of worry; its unexpected, demoralizing, a short-term madness of anxiety, completely out of percentage to its cause; there may even be no cause discoverable. It will be the concern with a mass of men and women, or, figuratively, of pets.
    • a tool that signals the occurrence of some unwelcome event
    • fear resulting from the awareness of danger
    • an automatic signal (usually an audio) caution of danger
    • a clock that wakes a sleeper at some preset time
  • verb-transitive:
    • To fill with security; frighten. See Synonyms at anxiety, frighten.
    • to provide caution to.
    • To phone to arms for security; to provide notice to (any one) of approaching danger; to rouse to vigilance and action; to put up the alert.
    • to help keep in excitement; to interrupt.
    • To amaze with apprehension of danger; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening bad; to stimulate with unexpected worry.
    • To fill with alarm; frighten. See Synonyms at concern, frighten.
    • to provide warning to.
    • To call to hands for defense; to offer notice to (anyone) of approaching danger; to rouse to vigilance and activity; to hold the alert.
    • maintain in pleasure; to interrupt.
    • To surprise with apprehension of risk; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening evil; to excite with abrupt concern.
  • verb:
    • To call to arms for security
    • to provide (some body) notice of approaching risk
    • To rouse to vigilance and activity; to place on the alert.
    • To surprise with apprehension of danger; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening evil; to excite with abrupt fear.
    • to help keep in excitement; to disturb.
    • warn or arouse to a feeling of risk or phone to a state of readiness
    • fill with apprehension or alarm; reason to be unpleasantly amazed
    • To call to hands for protection
    • To give (someone) notice of nearing risk
    • To rouse to vigilance and activity; to hold the alert.
    • To shock with apprehension of risk; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening wicked; to stimulate with sudden anxiety.
    • maintain in excitement; to disturb.
    • warn or arouse to a sense of risk or phone to a state of preparedness
    • fill with apprehension or security; cause to be unpleasantly astonished
  • others:
    • To call to arms for security; provide notice of risk to; rouse to vigilance and exertions for security: as, alarm the watch.
    • To surprise with apprehension of danger; disturb with sudden anxiety; fill with anxiety because of the possibility of bad.
    • to offer an alarm.
    • To phone to arms for protection; offer notice of danger to; rouse to vigilance and exertions for safety: as, alarm the watch.
    • To surprise with apprehension of danger; interrupt with unexpected fear; fill with anxiety by the prospect of wicked.
    • To give an alarm.
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